Skip to main content

Full text of "Friedberg Moravian Church : the first two hundred years, 1773-1973"

See other formats


" i 



*«>• 



HI - , 



f \)t Jftrsi ®foo ;iundmt fears 



1773 - 1973 



THE LIBRARY OF THE 

UNIVERSITY OF 

NORTH CAROLINA 

AT CHAPEL HILL 




THE COLLECTION OF 
NORTH CAROLINIANA 

PRESENTED BY 



Billy Pope 



C284.609 
C629f 






UNIVERSITY OF NX. AT CHAPEL HILL 



00042728851 



FOR USE ONLY IN 
THE NORTH CAROLINA COLLECTION 









Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

Institute of Museum and Library Services, under the provisions of the Library Services and Technology Act, administered by the State Library of North Carolina, a division of Cultural Resources. 



http://archive.org/details/friedbergmoraviaOOjone 





<mm&<m 



u 



fttje Jfirfit <Etoo HunbreD gear* 

1773-1973 



» 



Editor - Jerry V. Jones 




^pmn^a Jfriebberg 



f&jrartB n&xr Iht/pfritA if furim f A J0ay it wi/er cuzt, 

mi w ItMhu Uotv£r$ t* pe*cefo(frol>b /# ('<qH a/fjdaJc., 

Ciller -(crfd ti&*ori£} tfiti titer will fde*. 

Neath ifuj 9oMjjj fijfhirtj) cedar$ ju*( acre** the #au 
Mom low m# e/etp a ufa.it i^ rewreclic/t defi. 
3rt ft* fe^e/rcc ef ' tb* ^ap/oar t6e# are <?aie,d/fJwi 
$0011 jljfrti a.ffc#iUc mere eier-ziaiLf , 

fa, Tift ,14**0* 



Page 2 




Snow Scene "The Hill Of Peace" by Margeret Kaye Everhart 



■■■ 




Today was just an ordinary day - 
I went about my tasks the usual way; 
The path was one that I had often trod, 
But oh, the difference - 
Now I walk with God. 

Today was just an ordinary day, 
The usual work, and then a bit of play, 
But oh, the sense of peace at eventide 
To know that God and I walk 
Side by side! 



Paul Little receives Adult Baptism on Palm Sunday '73 
as his wife Ruth stands at his side. 




Rev. Giesler pronounces "The Lord is risen indeed" as the Easter graveyard service 
begins at the church door. 





Entranceway leading to "God's Acre." 



The Moravian Star 





Christmas Eve Lovefeast 1972 



Still visible the 1823 cornerstone is to the right of the front 
entrance of the old church. 




The band is a vital part of all festival occasions including the 200th 
Anniversary Celebration April 1st through the 8th, 1973. 





Chief Usher, C. J. Mize, greets 
each member. 




Congregational singing is an important part of each worship service. 



Friedberg has continued its 
fine reputation for the 
delicious big congregational 
meals. 




Each Sunday morning, the bandsmen greet the Friedberg con- 
gregation with familiar chorales. 




A small sparrow keeps watch from the 
steeple as the evening sun settles in the 
western sky casting a spell of quietness 
over "The Hill of Peace." 



The beauty of "God's Acre" at Easter is the result of much work and many 
flowers from our living members. 




V 



9j A A 



-v^ 




The Adult Choir helps the con- 
gregation to worship through the 
beauty of music. 



The Country Ham & Chicken Pie Suppers are always a successful project 
of The Women's Fellowship. 








Page 8 



i?e&€eft®!3j9 



Page 9 



ii 



»> 



Che Jfricbfaerg &torp 

By The Rev. John Giesler 

Born in Pfaffenhofen, Germany on January 20, 1720, Adam Spach, was baptized in the 
Lutheran Church, but came of age in Manokasy, Maryland. Here he came in contact with the 
Moravians and helped to found the Graceham Church. In 1752 he married Maria Elizabeth 
Hueter and soon after their wedding they met Nathaniel Seidel and learned first hand of the 
Moravian settlement in North Carolina. In May of 1754 they left for Wachovia. Their plan 
was to settle close by where they could farm and enjoy the spiritual, economic, and 
educational advantages of the projected settlement. 

He immediately sought out the leaders and chose the land just south of the Moravian 
purchase in what is now the Arcadia township of Davidson County. In a few years he and his 
neighbors had a community going in spite of Indian disturbances which forced them to move 
into the Bethabara stockade at times. They were anxious for the Moravians to come and hold 
worship services in their community south of the Ens Creek or South Fork. Finally in 1759 
Ludolph Gottlieb Bachhof came to hold service for the interested families: Adam Spach, 
George Hartman, Johannes Muller, Michel Faber, Christian Frey, Peter Frey, Martin Walk, 
Christian Hartman, and Christian Zimmerman. 

The first public service was held at the home of Adam Spach on Tuesday, November 24, 
1759 at 6:00 p.m. The service consisted of a liturgy of evening prayer, a sermon on the 
opening verses of the Magnificat Luke 1:46-47 and closed with a singing hour or Singstunde. 

Walking to Bethabara on Wednesday, Bachhof must have been encouraged for he return- 
ed on Advent Sunday December 2, and again on Christmas day to hold a service the morning 
of the 26th. In his diary he records several more trips in 1760, but our 
diaries do not record more visits until January 24, 1766 when Rev. 
John Ettwein and Rev. Lorenz came to decide about a site for a 
meeting house and a graveyard. On May 6, 1766, Br. Peter Frey, Sr. 
was the first person laid to rest in "God's Acre". Br. Graff 
consecrated the land with prayer and a sermon on the text,"Except a 
corn of wheat fall into the ground and die it bringeth forth no fruit." 

The exact parcel of land for the project and the manner of paying 
expenses was worked out in December of 1766. The land was 
surveyed on January 6, 1767 and the site of the log building 
(thirty-four by twenty -eight) was laid out between the present road 
and the west side of the Graveyard. The building came under roof 
within the year but was not finished until two years later. Regular 
visits for worship continued until on Saturday March 11, 1769 a 
lovefeast was held and on Sunday the 12th the building was con- 
secrated and two children were baptized. The group asked that a 
society or church be organized and the slow process finally came to 

conclusion when in January of 1770 Brother and Sister Bachhof were called from the work in 
Bethania to become the lay-pastor and teacher and live in the two downstairs rooms and hold 



Page 10 




school and worship services upstairs in the hall. The Society was formally organized by Br. 
Utley and Br. Marshall on February 4, 1770 with eighteen couples and one married sister, or 
thirty-seven members, pledging to support the work. The Bachhofs were happily received at 
3:00 p.m. on Saturday February 17. Regular services began the following day and followed the 
general pattern of 9 a.m. worship (liturgy, general or seasonal); 10:00 a.m. Sermon; 11:00 
a.m. Children's Class (explanation of Bible passage, doctrinal subject or expansion of the 
sermon) then at 12:00 noon the Society members came together for business and a sharing of 
news from the mission fields or other areas, reading of sermons by Zinzendorf (always called 
the "Blessed Disciple") or other leaders, or the memoirs of prominent Moravians. 

The school began on February 27th with younger boys in the morning and afternoon and 
older boys in the evening. On the 28th the younger girls came in the morning and the older 
girls came in the afternoon. Thus each group had two sessions a week. Brother Bachhof used 
Wednesday and Saturday for visiting when weather permitted. Singstunden were held 
several times a week in the evenings. 

On Maundy Thursday a group of the Society members made the long walk to Bethabara 
together with their lay pastor. They attended the reading and Holy Communion Services and 
returned on Good Friday to observe the Reading in five installments. On Easter morning they 
began the liturgy at the school house at 9:00 a.m. and concluded their affirmation of faith in 
Christ's Resurrection around the three graves in God's Acre. The regular and special services 
of the year were all held but of special mention was the first Christmas Candle Lovefeast held 
on the 25th at 6:00 p.m. The Christmas Reading Service was first, then came the Lovefeast 
with the singing led by the violin of Br. Peter Volz. The children received Honey Cakes and a 
special verse for each. The Watchnight consisted of an English service at 7:00 p.m., a 
memorabilia service in German was next and in the third session there was an address on the 
text for the day. At midnight all rose to sing "Now Thank We All Our God" and then to fall 
on their knees to begin the new year in prayer. 

The life of the pastor and his people is full of rich examples of life in early Friedberg. The 
Diaries which will soon be published tell much of the woe and weal of everyday life. 

In 1771 several important events took place. One was the visit of Christian Gregor on 
September 29 when nearly all of the ninety people of the community filled the Hall for a 
Lovefeast. At the request of a number who had come from Pennsylvania the name of their 
home church "Heidelberg" was given to the area. However Adam Spach and others who had 
come from elsewhere felt this showed favor so Br. Marshall on December 19 gave the name 
Friedberg to this town and Friedland to the Broadbay, Maine colony to the east. The word 
Fried is the German equivilent of the Hebrew Salem so all three words mean peace. Berg is 
the word for "hill". Friedberg therefore means Peace Hill or Hill of Peace. 

On January 19, 1773 the leaders in Salem took pity on the Friedberg People and brought 
Holy Communion to them for the first time. This was of utmost solemnity and importance to 
all. Then on April 4, 1773, Friedberg was officially recognized as an official congregation of 
the World Wide Unity of Brethren following action of the Synod in Herrnhut. The final step 
was completed on October 17 when Br. Bachhof was ordained a Deacon. He had first Com- 
munion on November 28,.. Now Friedberg, had its., own ordained pastor, was an official 



Page 11 



congregation and had a growing educational program. The nineteen years of prayer, planning, 
and hardwork achieved fulfillment. 

During these years the medical staff came regularly to the community to perform 
minor surgery, give medicine, or to let blood. This was a wonderful blessing for these pioneers. 

A near disaster struck on November 16, 1775 when during school session a heavy 
windstorm tore the roof off the heads of the students and Br. Bachhof . He sang hymns and 
spoke of the Saviour to calm his class. No one was injured. In a short time families arrived 
and immediately began to make repairs. The next morning the roof was back and everything 
repaired. 

The tribulations of the American Revolution were great on this congregation of pacifists. 
By order of the King of England, Moravians did not have to bear arms, but this was offset by 
cruel and harsh taxes and conscription of food and horses. The American patriots also used 
the well run farms of the community for food. Seeking to be fair and not take sides meant they 
had to pay double. 

Shortly after the Declaration of Independence was published, Friedberg lost their 
founding pastor as on September 21, 1776 he went to be with his Lord, and his remains are 
among the first fruits of our God's Acre. 

Soon after, Br. Valentine Beck, another lay-pastor, began his pastorate of nine years 
through the war and under the shakey Articles of the Confederation. 

In February of 1777 a cellar was dug behind the School House and paved with four loads 
of stone. A small room was built above the cellar to give the family with children more room. 
A garden fence and gate was added to help with the food supply. Br. Beck did good work and 
was ordained in July of 1778. Just before Christmas of that year the Becks lost most of their 
material possessions as the school house was plundered by destitute soldiers in the area. In 
July of 1782 after a brief but harsh illness his wife died and a year later Br. Beck went to 
Heidelberg, Pennsylvania and married a single sister selected by the Provincial Elders' 
Conference and approved by the lot. 

The war ended in 1783 and Friedberg, along with Salem, celebrated the 4th of July as 
proclaimed by Governor Martin. 

The next pastor was the able minister and musician Rev. Simon Peter. He was called to 
help the growing community build their first real church. On Christmas Day of 1785, a few 
months after his arrival, the congregation voted to build. Plans were drawn for the new log 
church to be just a bit larger than the School House, 30' x 35', and to be located next to it and 
connected by a passageway. On February 19, 1786 Count Johannes de Watteville, husband of- 
Zinzendorf's daughter, Benigna, preached at the cornerstone laying. A brief period of 
dissension was overcome and progress on the church continued for over two years until its 
completion including the fine cabinet work done by Jacob Krause. 

Each year the Friedberg community celebrated their annual Festival in commemoration 
of the Lovefeast and dedication held in the School House on March 11 and 12 of 1769. In 1786 



Page 12 



and 1787 Rev. Peter got musicians from Salem to come out to make the Festival more 
meaningful with beautiful orchestral and chorale music. His brother J. F. Peter was among 
those who came. On March 12, 1788, the formal dedication of the completed church was held 
with much dignity. The music of the choir and orchestra was "very sweet coming down from 
the gallery." 

The next Pastor was the former Indian missionary Martin Schneider, who came in June 
of 1791. The school house rooms were refurnished and new stone steps were built at the west 
door of the church where the sisters entered. Later the school room upstairs was divided into 
two rooms. 

Rev. John Gambold, another Indian Missionary, was the next pastor. He lost his wife a 
few months after arriving in 1804 and was replaced soon after by Rev. C. D. Buchholz. During 
his term a new well was dug to supplement the failing spring. Rev. C. D. Rude came next and 
served the longest pastorate in the first century, fifteen years. The 50th Golden Jubilee 
Anniversary was celebrated in 1819 with a great deal of special music. The church had grown 
from the original few families to a total of 338. Another new church was needed. The noted 
pastor, missionary, musician, and translator, Christian Frederick Denke was called. He came 
in 1822 and shortly after a Building Committee was elected and the work begun. The new 




church and parsonage was planned to be built across the road from the previous two build- 
ings and the cornerstone which still sits under our present church was laid on February 5, 
1823. In July of the year Br. Denke was able to secure the first organ brought to Bethabara by 
the Moravians. It served Friedberg for sixty more years before being sold. The music 
during his pastorate was much improved with the organ to help. 



Page 13 



The cedar trees were planted to beautify the graveyard. The work on the large new 
building went on with great sacrifice as times were hard. The parsonage section was finished 
first and in June 1825 the Denke's moved to their new quarters. Contrary to the pastor's 
warnings of danger the new method of plastering was used to decorate the church. A number 
of out buildings were completed and kitchens for the church and parsonage were built from 
the logs of the old church. Flooring from the old church was used in the three sided gallery. 
The benches were made by one family and the other families contributed to the cost. The costs 
mounted and in order to finish everything the congregation had to mortgage the property to 
borrow money for the remaining bills. But the great day of dedication arrived on July 28, 1827 
and a great procession of over 1500 people, clergy, musicians, members, and visitors formed 
at the site of the old church and to the chorales of the trombone choir, marched in order to 
the new building for a most impressive celebration. 

With the new facilities and with the new spirit of the times the Charity Sunday School 
was begun on September 30, 1827. This had a profound influence on the people over the years. 

Br. Denke also began a new tradition of the Mayfeast to replace the old March Festival. 
This was held on the Saturday nearest the 12th which was the date the Brotherly Agreement 
was first signed in 1727 in Herrnhut. 

Numerous improvements were made on the buildings with a covered walk between 
church and dieners kitchen and four acres of land north of the church was purchased. 

During this time Br. Denke lost his wife and companion of many years but soon married 
a teacher from Salem, where they retired in 1833. 

April 21, 1833 Rev. A. H. Schulz was installed by his father who was president of the 
Provincial Elders Conference. Br. Schulz was a deeply spiritual man and worked hard to win 
the hearts of the people to a more serious relationship with the Lord. His work was hampered 
by the continued debt on the building; so finally in 1835, thirty-nine and one-half acres of land 
were sold to pay off the debt. 

During the decade of 1825-1835 a number of families began to feel the pains of continued 
population growth as land became more and more difficult to obtain. Under the leadership of 
Br. Martin Hauser a good number of young couples joined in moving to Indiana and Illinois 
to found two Moravian communities there. 

The years leading up to the Civil War were ones of little change except in language. In 
about twenty years the prominence of German in Church School and home fell until by 1857 it 
became nearly obsolete. 

The war years brought hardships and suffering to all of the country and although little 
fighting occured in the area the economy was destroyed and the crushing defeat was felt by all 
for years afterward. But a real revival swept through the congregation in 1866. The growth of 
the church and community was slow to respond to the needs of the time, but during the long 
pastorate of Br. James E. Hall the congregation began to show new life. The grounds and 
buildings were greatly improved with remodeling. The preaching places of Advent and 



Page 14 



Enterprise built their first permanent buildings and regular Sunday Schools and Worship 
Services began to be held. The need for a larger church then prompted the decision to build a 
separate parsonage and use the parsonage area for expansion of the church. The parsonage 
was completed in 1900 and the sanctuary expanded shortly thereafter. 

It is interesting to note that when the newly remodeled church was used the traditional 
"kiss of peace" used in communion services (between one's own sex) was replaced by the 
"right hand of Fellowship." The common cup soon gave way to the individual cup and wine 
was replaced by grape juice. Changes were taking place. Growth of Friedberg, Advent, and 
Enterprise soon made it possible for new pastors to serve the chapels and the Friedberg 
pastor to concentrate on one congregation. Rev. Samuel Tesch led the congregation in a large 
expansion program in the 1930's with a new Christian Education wing and a large balcony 
and vestibule added to the building. The sanctuary was totally redesigned and the direction 
changed once again. In 1938 these extensive additions were completed and dedicated. These 
facilities served throughout World War II and the Korean War until 1957 when a new modern 
parsonage was built and the old parsonage became a annex for Christian Education. A new 
era of growth began in the community. The year 1967 marked the dedication of the large 
Christian Education Building and the adjoining Fellowship Hall built under the leadership of 
Rev. Henry Lewis. These new facilities greatly expanded the program of music and youth as 
an assistant in Christian Education and Music, Br. Raymond Ebert, joined the staff. A 
week-day Kindergarten was begun in 1967 renewing the Friedberg School which had served 
one hundred and fifty years before closing in 1922. 

In 1972 two important committees began to work. Under the leadership of Rev. John 
Giesler, a 200th Anniversary Committee secured a grant of $4,000.00 to study the past, 
present and future of our community. This resulted in the translation of the diaries from 
1759-1773 by Donald Lineback, the securing of many priceless photos and articles of age and 
value, and a great increase in community interest throughout our area, and even to several 
items of national publicity. A musical program of unique quality and interest was held 
under the direction of Dr. Thor Johnson in October 1973. It consisted entirely of music 
composed by Friedberg pastors or their families. A twenty-two piece orchestra and a one 
hundred voice choir was featured. Twelve first modern performances and premiers were 
included. 

The other important committee is the Planning Council which has been working on plans 
for a new sanctuary, music department, a historic Friedberg Room and other needed 
facilities. Their plans were adopted by over 90% of the Special Church Council meeting in 
June 1973. Work will begin soon on this needed area as well as the incorporating of many 
historic features still surviving in the present church. 

Last but not least is the fact that the history of Friedberg would not be complete without 
mentioning the work of over twenty men from our congregation who have gone into full time 
service for tne Lord in the Christian Ministry. This work is still going on with five men now 
serving f i the promise of more to come. 

The story does not end here. What kind of history are we making today? 



Page 15 



Jfnefcberg lime Hint 



MINISTERS OF FRIEDBERG 













Adam Spach Rock House 



LUDOLPH G. BACHHOF 
(1770-1776) 



FRIEDBERG'S HISTORY 



1752 Survey Party selected land 
for Wachovia; 

1754 Adam Spach arrived in 
North Carolina: 



1757-1758 Spach's family and 
others moved to Bethabara because 
of the war; 

1759 (November 22) Bachhofheld 
the First Service; 

1766 Rev. Ettwein lays out site for 
the school house and the graveyard; 

(May 11) First interment in 
the graveyard, Peter Frey, Sr. ; 

1769 First service, a lovefeast, held 
in school house (the only meeting 
house); 

1770 (February 4) South Fork 
Society organized; 

(February 17) Bachhof and 
wife move from Bethabara; 

(February 27) Boys School 
begins; 

(February 28) Girls School 
begins; 

(April 16) First Easter 
Service held - ending in the 
graveyard; 

(December 24) First 
Candlelight Lovefeast held; 

1771 (December) The name 
"Friedberg" meaning " the hill of 
peace" becomes official; 

1773 (April 4) Friedberg 
Congregation received into the 
Moravian Church; 



NATIONAL EVENTS 



1756-1763 FRENCH & INDIAN 
WAR 



1765 STAMP ACT 



Page 16 



VALENTINE BECK 
(1776-1785 



SIMON PETER 
(1785-1791) 



MARTIN SCHNEIDER 
(1791-1804) 



JOHN GAMBOLD 
(1804-1805) 

C. D. BUCHHOLZ 
(1805-1806) 

C. D. RUDE 
(1807-1822) 



C. F. DENKE 
(1822-1832) 



1774 The Rock House was built; 



1783 (July 4) Independence Day 
celebrated in Friedberg; 



1788 (March 12) The Second 
Church consecrated: 









i^SEWWvt 




1823 (February 5) Cornerstone 
for the Third Church laid; 

1825 (July 28) Third Church 
consecrated - including a new 
pipe organ; 

1827 Sunday School organized 
for first time; 



1776-1783 REVOLUTIONARY 
WAR 



1788 U.S. CONSTITUTION 

RATIFIED 

1789 George Washington 
inaugurated as President of the 
United States; 

1790 First U.S. CENSUS 
(3,929,625 persons) 

1793 Eli Whitney invented the 
Cotton Gin; 

1800 Washington, D. C. becomes 
the U.S. Capitol; 

1801-1809 Thomas Jefferson 
U.S. President 



1809-1817 James Madison 
U.S. President 

1817-1825 James Monroe 
U.S. President 

1819 U.S. Financial Panic 



1825-1829 JohnQ. Adams 
U.S. President 



1829-1837 Andrew Jackson 
U.S. President 



Page 17 




H.A. SCHULTZ 
(1832-1839 



A* 



SAMUEL RENATUS HUEBNER 
(1840-1844) 




E. T. SENSEMAN 
(1844-1851) 




FRANCES FLORENTINE HAGEN 
(1851-1854) 




1836 BATTLE AT THE ALAMO 

1837-1841 Martin Van Buren 
U.S. President 



1841 -William Henry Harrison 
U.S. President 

1841-1845 John Tyler 
U.S. President 

1845-1849 James K. Polk 
U.S. President 

1845-1848 MEXICAN WAR 



1848 Gold discovered in 
California; 

1849-1850 Zachary Taylor 
U.S. President 



1850-1853 Millard Fillmore 
U.S. President 



1853-1857 Franklin Pierce 
U.S. President 



Page 18 




LEWIS RIGHTS 
(1854-1865) 




R, P. LINEBACK 
(1865-1872) 




A. LICHTENTHAELER 
(1872-1873) 




D. Z. SMITH 
(1873-1877) 



1866 REVIVAL swept Friedberg 
when over 60 people joined the 
church in less than a year; 



1857-1861 James Buchanan 

U.S. President 

1861-1865 Abraham Lincoln 
U.S. President 



1861-1365 U.S. CIVIL WAR 

1865 (April 15) Lincoln's 
assassination; 

1865-1869 Andrew Johnson 

U.S. President 



1867 ALASKA PURCHASE 



1869 TRANSCONTINENTAL 
RAILROAD 

1871 CHICAGO FIRE 



1877-1881 Rutherford Hayes 
U.S. President 



Page 19 




J. B. LINEBACK 
(1877-1881) 




J. E. HALL 
(1881-1901) 




J. F. McCUISTON 
(1901-1908) 




EDGAR A. HOLTON 
(1909-1916) 



1882 Built steeple and redesigned 
pulpit area inside the church; 



1900 First separate parsonage was 
built; 

1900 Church was expanded and 
rearranged again; 




1879 EDISON'S LIGHTBULB 
INVENTED 

1881 James Garfield 
U.S. President 

1881-1885 Chester Arthur 
U.S. President 



1885-1889 Grover Cleveland 
U.S. President 



1889-1893 Ben Harrison 
U.S. President 

1893-1897 Grover Cleveland 
U.S. President 

1894 INCOME TAX BEGUN 

1897-1901 William McKinley 
U.S. President 

1898 SPANISH-AMERICAN WAR 

1901-1909 Teddy Roosevelt 
U.S. President 

1903 WRIGHT BROTHERS FLY 

1909-1913 W. Howard Taft 
U.S. President 

1913-1921 Woodrow Wilson 
U.S. President 

1913-1914 WORLD WAR I 

1915 U.S. Population is one 
hundred million; 

1917 U.S. enters W. W. I 



Page 20 




HERBERT JOHNSON 
(1917-1921) 




J. F. McCUISTON 

(Second Pastorate) 

(1921-1926) 




SAMUEL J. TESCH 
(1927-1939) 




JOHN W. FULTON 
(1939-1945) 




1928 Friedberg organizes the band; 




|I If I II Bra 




ill 



1942 Passion Week reading was 
held in the homes due to gas 
shortage; 



1921-1923 Warren Harding 
U.S. President 



1923-1929 Calvin Coolidge 
U.S. President 



1927 LINDBERG FLIES ATLANTIC 



1929 THE DEPRESSION 



1933-1945 Franklin Roosevelt 
U.S. President 



1939-1945 WORLD WAR II 
1941 U. S. enters W. W„ II 



Page 21 




RICHARD F. AMOS 
(1945-1948) 




C. TRUETT CHADWICK 
(1949-1952) 




WILLIAM T. MARSHALL 
(1953-1962) 




HENRY A. LEWIS 
(1963-1969) 




1958 New parsonage built; 




JS J ( l:.li 



1967 New Fellowship Hall and 
Christian Education building 
completed and consecrated; 



1945-1953 Henry Truman 
U.S. President 



1950-1953 KOREAN WAR 



1961-1963 John Kennedy 
IT. S. President 



1963 (November 22) 
Kennedy's Assassination 

1962 John Glenn orbits the 
earth in a space craft; 

1963-1969 Lyndon Johnson 
U.S. President 

1966 Surveyor I lands on the 
moon; 



Page 22 



JOHN H. GIESLER 
(1969- ) 



1972 (October 15) The first 
Handbell Choir organized and 
named The Young Carillons; 

1972 North Carolina awarded a 
grant to Friedberg to study our 
rich heritage; 

1972 (December) The second 
Handbell Choir organized and 
named The English Handbell 
Choir (for members above age 
21); 

1973 An entire year of activities 
planned to celebrate our 200th 
Anniversary; 



1969 Man walks on the moon from 
the United States: 



1973 Viet Nam War Ends; 







Jfrtebberg JfWen 
3n ®f)e JWintetrp 

Samuel J. Tesch-Bishop- 

Pastor Emeritus 

Friedberg Moravian Church 

Glenn E. Craver-Pastor- 

New Eden Moravian Church 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Lewis B. Swaim- Director- 
Board Of Homeland Missions 
Winston-Salem, N. C. 

Robert M. Rierson-Pastor- 

Coral Ridge Moravian Church 
Ft. Lauderdale, Florida 

C. Jerome Livengood- Pastor - 

First Moravian Church 
Greensboro, N. C. 

John Charles Foltz-Pastor- 

First Church Of The Nazarene 
Mooresville, N. C. 



©m J$lmt£ter 

The Rev. John H. Giesler 



Page 23 




Jfeberal (grant 

Stoartiet) tKo 
jfriebticrg 



A program, funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, was offered by the 
North Carolina Committee for Continuing Education in the Humanities to rural communities 
in rapid change. The proposal, "Friedberg, A Pioneer Community In Rapid Double Change", 
written by Rev. John H. Giesler, on behalf of the 200th Anniversary Committee of Friedberg 
Church, was one of the thirty selected from the whole state and was the only church so 
honored. The original grant of $3,500.00 was raised to $4,000.00 because of the high level of 
success in carrying out the program. This grant provided the funds for the preparation and 
translation of the first 400 pages of the Friedberg Diary from 1759-1773 and the three Public 
Meetings held and materials displayed. 




Page 24 



w «~ •T" 




u 



€arlp 
%iit 



Jfrtebfacrg 



9* 



By Donald J. Lineback 

Friedberg's Diary offers us a rare glimpse into the daily lives of some of the first settlers 
of this area. Written in German by Ludolph Gottlieb Bachhof, a school teacher and preacher 
for the Moravians, the first years of the Diary tell of the beginnings of a society that for two 
centuries has maintained its integrity as a rural community centered around the church. 

In 1770 immediately after Bachhof moved from Bethania to Friedberg, then called the 
Society on the Ens, he began the Diary. Each event that he considered of spiritual or 
historical importance has been recorded. Details abound, especially in scenes of spiritual 
encounters. But more often Bachhof writes with an austere terseness that indicates his 
no-nonsense attitude toward life. 

Essential to our conception of early Friedberg is the fact that Bachhof paints a 
non-idealized picture of the founders of the community, with their shortcomings as apparent 
as their many virtues. Relying on Bachhof's information, I shall depict for you the early 
Friedberg community life as I understand it. Gradually as more of the Diary is brought 
out, these general outlines may be filled in with more details. 

I have selected material from the first four years of the Diary and arranged it according 
to the human life cycle. Keeping in mind the vulnerability of any statement about things 
"typical," let us follow this cycle as it evolves in early Friedberg from birth through 
childhood, youth, adulthood, and death. 

We know that the early Friedberg families were fruitful and did multiply, for births occur 
with almost rhythmic frequency. In 1772, for example, a child was born in nearly one out of 
every two households. In the "Memorabilia" for the Friedberg Society at the end of that year, 
Br. Bachhof counts 129 people in the community. The adult population comprises thirty-four 
married brethren and sisters plus one other married woman. Thus if we exclude the Bachhofs, 
who had no children, we find that seventeen Friedberg households were blessed with a total 
of ninety -four children! 

Page 25 



When a child was born, its father went to Bachhof and requested baptism. Bachhof then 
wrote to Salem or Bethabara and a preacher was sent from there to the Friedberg school 
house to baptize the infant. The mother waited six weeks after giving birth before she 

The birth of Barbara Hartman is typical. We 
read, "On January 11, 1771, in the third hour 



resumed attending regular worship services 




of the morning a daughter was born to our Br. 
and Sr. G. Hartman. On Sunday the 13th 
during the children's class she was baptized by 
Br.Soelle into Jesus' death and received the 
name of Barbara." Six weeks later we find 
"After the reading of the litany (in the first 
worship service).. .Br. G. Hartman's wife and 
her daughter were both blessed with several 
verses. The mother was in the meeting room 
for the first time after her weeks (following 
childbirth)." 

Children were a special delight to the 
early Friedberg community. Indeed they were 
emulated by the adults, who strove to be 
"childlike" in their faith, so that they could 
become "children of God." Bachhof explains 
this idea as follows: "A child that has 
misbehaved and worried its mother soon 
comes to her, admits that it has done bad, and 

asks her for forgiveness; and that's what he (the adult) must do if he wants to be a child (of 

God)." 



The children were exposed to hymns and poems from their first appearance in the 
meeting room at baptism. Then when they were old enough they began to memorize verses, 
which served on Sunday as a text for the children's lesson, and during the week as a basis for 
exercises in writing and perhaps in speaking. Learning verses was more than a practical 
necessity however; it allowed a child to overcome his inarticulation and give voice to his 
innermost feelings. Thus he could attempt to express that which is with words inexpressible. 

Children occasionally brought to Br. Bachhof verses they had written down at home. 
Although the verses are probably not original, they nevertheless are very personal 
expressions of faith. Bachhof quotes several of these poems. In the original German they 
are quite beautiful in their simplicity. One such poem written by Peter Frey's son Johannes 
reads in translation: 

Where is Christ my Consolation, 
Lord and Master, Friend so dear? 
Where is He who gives salvation? 
Where is He whom I revere? 
My poor soul is worn with sorrow, 
Sin and grief upon it weigh. 
Where is Jesus whom I follow? 
Him I long for night and day. 



Page 26 



The children were expected to sing hymns in certain worship services and undoubtedly 
looked forward to displaying their skills. Especially at Christmastime when Christ the Child 
was honored, the children would be called on to perform, and as Br. Bachhof says, they really 
sang out. Not the least of their rewards for singing were honeycakes, gingerbread, or apples - 
and always more verses from their teacher. 

There is ample evidence that the children were quite serious about their faith. Br. 
Bachhof records one incident as follows: "Little Christian Stauber...said that he had been 
restless in his heart for some time because he had once called his brother Franz a fool. And 
then he had heard me say, 'Whosoever shall call his brother a fool shall be in danger of hell 
fire.' That is what made him restless. And he thought his sin was so great that it could not be 
forgiven him. But another time he had heard in a sermon that when a person has sinned so 
much and so grossly, as soon as it grieves him to the heart and he seeks forgiveness from the 
Savior, he will receive from Him not only for- 
giveness of sins but also the strength not to be 
a slave of sin any more. ..Now he (Christian) 
told me he would ask the dear Savior for 
forgiveness and would never again call anyone 
a fool." 

Ludolph Bachhof organized the children's 
school soon after he moved into the commu- 
nity. On February 27, 1770, the boys began 
attending school - the younger ones during the 
day and the older ones in the evening after 
work. The next day the girls came - the 
younger ones in the morning and the older 
ones in the afternoon. Br. Bachhof intended to 
hold to this alternating schedule four days a 
week throughout the year except for harvest 
time and periods of bad weather or sickness. 
All went well for over two years, but toward 
the end of 1772 there was a spate of excitement over Bachhof 's scheduling of classes, which in 
effect segregated the boys from the girls. For reasons which are not made clear - perhaps the 
mothers wanted to send all of their children away from home at the same time - the Stewards 
of Bachhof's Society went to Br. Marschall in Bethabara and requested that the classes be 
integrated. A week later Bachhof wrote Br. Marschall to give his side of the argument, and 
Br. Marschall came the following weekend to arbitrate the issue. With some apprehension 
Bachhof resigned himself to the wishes of the majority as he wrote, "(Br. Marschall) talked 
with the Society about the change in the school, but in spite of the most thorough 
argumentation (probably from Bachhof himself) could do nothing but let the boys and girls 
here, like those in the Pennsylvania country congregations, go to school at the same time. 
Thus on Monday the 7th we began, with 8 boys and 9 girls for the first time. I arranged them 
so that the boys and girls who were reading sat on one bench and the children who were 
saying their ABC's and were spelling sat on the other bench. At mealtime I let the children of 
each family sit together at the table, sang a verse for them before and after the meal, remained 
with them during the meal, and appointed a girl to fetch and pour water for them and also to 
clean off the table afterwards. Then (I) had them all pick cotton to pass the time until school 
started again; and so for today school went along right well." 




Page 27 



As we have just seen, children were not allowed to be idle, even during their afternoon 
recess period. Nor were they to be left to their own devices. Br. Bachhof was explicit on this 
subject when he "impressed upon the hearts of the Society's members that they should keep 
close watch over their children, especially the grown ones, and never leave them alone." It 
was not just the children's spiritual welfare that was jeopardized by lack of supervision; they 
sometimes suffered physically as well. Br. Bachhof tells of what happened to Adam Spach's 
six-year-old daughter, Hannel: she fetched an ax, gave it to her younger brother Jacob, laid 
her hand on the block, and said, "Now start chopping." He did, and she lost two fingers. 

As children grew older, their capricious nature was considered more and more 
reprehensible. One young man was admonished for being frivolous in Salem one day. When 
his conduct did not improve he was excluded from the Society on his nineteenth birthday. At 
times the older children got into such fights that Br. Bachhof had to remind their parents to 
make peace. And belligerence was not the only youthful passion that Bachhof frowned upon. 
In December, 1773, he wrote in the Diary, "Spach's wife came.. .and said that she had asked 
her daughter Marie whether she hadn't taken a liking to Ezechial Gaslin. After denying it 




several times Marie did admit it finally and said that he had given her a very friendly look in 
church one day; that's when she started liking him." Later young Gaslin came to the Spachs 
to help make bricks, and while there he sneaked up to Marie and tried to kiss her. 
Unfortunately Bachhof does not record his reaction nor the outcome of the affair. 

As young people became adults they took on adult responsibilities. The men drove 
wagons for Br. Bagge the merchant, constructed buildings and roads, and of course worked 
on their parents' farms. When they married, the announcement would be made three times, as 
was the custom. Then when they settled upon their own piece of land, or when someone new 
moved into the community, all the men in the area would help build a house for them. The 
almost casual mentioning of the various construction projects undertaken by the Friedberg 
men both within and outside their community provides the surest evidence of early 
Friedberg's real sense of brotherhood. In the years 1770 through 1773 they helped build, 
among other things, the Salem Gemein-Haus (where Salem College's Main Hall now stands), 
the Micksch house, the bridge and millhouse on Salem Creek, the single brethren's house, a 



Page 28 




tan-mill, and a storehouse for hides, as well as a number of houses and barns for their 
neighbors. 

Frequently one reads in the Diary of log houses being "blocked up." That is to say the 
logs were shaped and stacked into place. This work was difficult at best and as Br. Friedrich 
Boeckel found out, it had its dangers. The Diary records a construction accident he had: 
"Friedrich Boeckel, who along with others from here was helping his Br. Joh. Nicol. block up 
his new house, through the faithful watch of the heavenly Father was graciously saved from 
injury when he fell from the highest log, flipped over twice, and landed in a normal seated 
position. It did nothing more than knock him out for a half hour." 

To be sure the women worked as much as their men. The usual activities for a woman 
besides caring for her home and family included spinning and weaving, wine and cider 




Page 29 



making, and helping her husband work the fields or clear new land. Once we even find Georg 
Hahn's wife helping block up their house! 

Together the families raised crops of barley, oats, wheat, Indian corn, cabbage, cotton, 
and flax. They had apple and peach trees, horses, and number of head of cattle. These families 
were obviously very industrious - so much so in fact that on one occasion Br. Bachhof had to 
remind them not to work on Sundays and festival days. Otherwise they were liable to being 
called "Freethinkers." 

Normally the people of Friedberg attended worship services in the school house two days 
a week. On Thursdays there was a service at noon in which Br. Bachhof would read a 
discourse written by the late Count Zinzendorf or another church official. And on Sundays 
there was a series of separate worship services, beginning with the litany. It was followed by 
the sermon and then the children's class. Afterwards there was often a special gathering for 
the members of the Society. During this service Bachhof mentioned items of less public 
interest and he often read from the regularly circulated, handwritten copies of the church's 
worldwide newspaper called the Gemein-Nachrichten. In this manner the people of Friedberg 
learned of the missionary activities of their brethren and sisters in Greenland, the Virgin 
Islands, Surinam, Cairo, and even Moscow. Friedberg participated in the missions not only in 
spirit but also through regular donations. 

After the service for members of the Society, there were at times special services for the 
communicant members alone, and as of January, 1772, communion was held at the Friedberg 
school house, so that the communicants no longer had to travel to Salem or Bethabara. The 
taking of communion was the source of the most serious trouble encountered by this new 
community. I shall explain the problem in a moment. Before communion and on certain other 
occasions such as festival days, the people would hold a lovefeast, during which there would 
be singing and often a special discourse. 

The importance of music to all worship services cannot be underestimated. Just like their 
children, adults gave voice to their emotions through verses of hymns. This practice found its 
culmination in the Singstunde, a service in which selected verses from various hymns were 
sung by the congregation so as to form a kind of musical sermon. The singing was 
complemented at least once by Br. Volz on his violin. Songs were also used to console the sick 
and dying and they served as birthday greetings, just as we would send cards. On January 6, 
1772, for example, Bachhof records that the Adam Spachs came over and sang several verses 
for him on his fifty-fifth birthday, and the following day they did the same for his wife on her 
fifty-third. 

Br. Bachhof does not overlook matters that are delicate or even downright embarrassing, 
and the Diary is all the more believable because of it. There were petty quarrels between the 
Zimmermans and the Spachs, the Spachs and the Hartmans, the Hartmans and the Muellers, 
and the Muellers and Matthes Weesner. In the last case Br. Weesner went so far as to obtain 
a warrant for Br. Mueller's arrest. Usually the quarrels were short-lived, but some lasted for 
weeks. 

One major disagreement developed when Brethren Reuter and Micksch came to survey 
land for the local people. After the surveyors left, several people discovered that they had less 
land than they thought, and they reacted as people do today - they blamed each other. For a 
while Friedberg was not the "Hill of Peace" as the feuding spread. It even caused Adam 

Page 30 



Spach to stop coming to preaching. He made this excuse to Br. Bachhof : "What good is it to 
me if I do come to preaching, because when I see that man (Zimmerman) in front of me, my 
anger is only aggravated again." 

More serious than these quarrels was the trouble over communion. Church members 
living in Friedberg were allowed to take communion only after asking permission of the 
church, which in turn used the lot to determine the Lord's approval. Occasionally the lot 
excluded church members from the service for no reason that was apparent to them. Lacking 
faith in the lot as an indication of the Lord's pleasure, some felt the process was unjust. In 
February, 1772, Bachhof writes, "Presently various people are of rather mixed emotions 
about the special worship services for communicant members. But I hope that these feelings 
will be forgotten soon." During that year one reads several entries in the Diary similiar to the 
following: "Joh.Nic.Boeckel visited me and complained that he often did not know what to do 
because of impatience and unrest in his heart. Since he had written to the church several times 
already and expressed his desire for communion and still had had no success, he thought that 
the Brethren did not want him. I told him, 'My dear Br., I can easily believe that you are very 
restless and often become impatient when things do not go immediately according to your 
inclination and will. But let this serve to make you eager to become a contrite sinner before 
the Savior. He desires nothing more of you than the whole, poor heart of a truly contrite 
sinner, one which makes no claims by right but rather considers itself constantly unworthy 
and yet in fervent need of all blessings and mercies of the Savior, including the sacrament of 
communion. Once the dear Savior has you as He wants you, He will certainly not leave you 
waiting long but rather will soon still your hunger and thirst'." At about the same time, Br. 
Peter Pfaff reported to Bachhof that several members of the Society were about to go to 
communion in the Anglican Church since they were not allowed to take communion here. Br. 
Bachhof replied, "That is all right." This reply might at first seem to show indifference, but 
upon closer examination we realize that Bachhof had no choice. He could bring no pressure to 
bear upon the Society's members, for they were not living in a closed settlement like Salem or 
Bethabara. His was the very difficult task of sustaining the doctrine of a communally 
oriented church in a noncommunal environment. As it turned out, few people actually left the 
church. 




Page 31 



Besides internal trouble there were problems imposed upon the community from outside. 
In March, 1770, the Regulators - a group of near-anarchists who rampaged through the 
countryside and towns - threatened to come through the area. They were followed by 
Governor Tryon and General Waddell along with their 3,500 men, who marched through 
Friedberg one day from morning till night. These troops requisitioned from the community 
one thousand pounds of meal and seven head of cattle. 

Another problem was caused by the muster announced by a Captain Zappfenfeld, or 
Sappingfield, who was calling up men to fight for the King. Non-communicants who did not 
volunteer were to be fined one shilling. For some reason, Friedberg's representative Georg 
Hartman agreed to give Zappfenfeld the names of the Society's members who were to be 
handed over to a courtmartial, perhaps because they would neither volunteer for the muster 
nor pay the fine. This infuriated many members of the community, and they split into 
factions. It is not clear how the community solved the problem of the muster, but Bachhof 
does note that after several weeks the feuding parties within the community were finally 
reconciled by the grace of the Savior. 

This incident had at least one positive result, in that it brought one man back into the 
Society. Friedrich Boeckel, whom we remember from the construction accident, had dropped 
out of the Society probably over the communion issue. Now his name appeared on a petition 
sent from the Friedberg Society to Captain Zappfenfeld. Upon seeing Boeckel's name on the 
petition, Br. Bachhof took the opportunity to welcome him back as an active member in the 
Society and cordially reminded him of the responsibilities that such a membership entailed. 

There are several major events during these years that were happier occasions. One was 
the visit of the BrethrenLorez and Gregor from Europe and Br. Ettwein from Pennsylvania. 
A large celebration was held for them at the school house, and it was attended by about one 
hundred persons. Another joyous event was the visit of Governor Josiah Martin and his 
entourage. He stayed for the night of August 9, 1772, at Christian Frey's house while on the 
way to Salem. 

A third event gives us cause to celebrate. In 1773, on April 4, Palm Sunday, Br. Bachhof 
makes the following entry in the Diary: "The Society had a lovefeast, during which Br. 
Marschall delivered the greetings of Brethren Gregor and Lorez as well as those of the entire 
Unity's Elders' Conference in Europe; and then he further announced that it is not proposed 
for the local (Friedberg) Society to have a constitution such as exists within the state 
churches but rather it should be a country congregation as in Pennsylvania." This was an 
important moment for Friedberg, for it officially established a permanent bond between the 
Moravian Church and the community. Friedberg was now recognized in Herrnhut as a 
Moravian congregation. 

Having spoken of birth, childhood, youth, and adulthood in early Friedberg, may I now 
mention the way the people came to terms with sickness and death. Br. Jacob Bonn, a medical 
doctor, came from Bethabara (and later Salem) to attend the sick. Occasionally he would let 
blood in the school house for as many as ten to twelve people at a time. Br. Bonn must have 
been especially busy in the fall of 1770 when the fever struck and in the spring of 1772 when 
many were down with coughing and chest fever. While some people were cured by Br. Bonn, 
others relied on home remedies. But nothing matched the cure Br. John Mueller found for 
his chronic fever. Bachhof records his sudden recovery: "(Mueller) told us that last Saturday 

Page 32 




a certain Irishman had unlawfully demanded 50 shillings of him, and he had gotten so excited 
that he lost his fever." 



Some however did not survive the epidemics. In February, 1773, young Daniel Hartman 
slowly succumbed to a respiratory ailment. The touching account of his death is told in detail 
by Br. Bachhof. Since it reveals much about the way the early Friedberg community faced 
death, I would like to quote it at length. Bachhof writes, "Saturday the 6th we visited the G. 
Hartmans and especially Daniel, their sick son. However I couldn't speak with him much 
because many non-Moravians were there. ..Monday the 8th... I heard from Br. Bonn, whom G. 
Hartman had fetched for his sick son Daniel, that the illness looked very critical. Therefore I 
went to see him, but first I spoke with his parents and asked them whether Daniel in his 
illness had not yet expressed his desire for baptism. They said no, and since he did not have 
much presence of mind, they hadn't asked him. Since they were now giving him some 
medicine, and since I noticed that he still had (the sense of) taste, I placed myself before his 
bed and asked him whether he still recognized me. He answered, 'Yes.' Then I said to him, 
'My dear Daniel,you are now very ill and can not know how soon the hour will strike for you to 
go out of time and into eternity. Therefore if you' still have in your heart a request, something 
for which you still long, then tell me.' He answered with a broken voice, 'Oh, I would still like 
very much to be baptized and to be washed of my sins with the Savior's blood.' Question: 'Do 
you love the Savior?' Answer: 'Yes.' 'Will you live and die upon His merits and death?' 
Answer: 'Yes.' Then I also sang to him some verses, commended him to the Savior, and 
wished him a blessed night.... Thursday the 11th in the early morning G. Hartman brought 
the news that his son Daniel was very weak and was bleeding profusely at the nose. He asked 
me to visit him soon. Therefore Br. Lorenz and I went immediately and we found it so. When 
Br. Lorenz spoke with him and heard the request of the sick boy for baptism, preparations 
were quickly made, and the neighborhood was told that the sick Daniel Hartman would be 
baptized at 10 o'clock this morning. At that time a considerable group of adults and children 
gathered in Georg Hartman's house, for whom Br. Lorenz first held a fervent talk on the 
watchword of the day, 'In thee the fatherless findeth mercy,' etc., in connection with the 
text..., 'Joy shall be in heaven over one sinner that repenteth, more than ninety and nine just 

Page 33 



persons, which need no repentance, and after having first received Absolution, the sick youth 
Daniel Hartman was baptized into Jesus' death with the name Christian Daniel, a name he 
himself had chosen. Friday the 12th I visited him again, found that he mostly had presence of 
mind, but in his fantasies was constantly on a journey. I sang him some verses and asked 
where he was traveling. He said, 'To the Savior.' I said, 'Fare well, and when you come to Him 
then greet Him for me.' 'Yes,' he answered, 'I shall do that.' Saturday the 13th I was with him 
from early morning until noon.... Monday the 15th visited Christian Daniel and found him 
having strong convulsions. Tuesday the 16th his parents took some hope for his recovery, 
because, by means of some honey, Christian Daniels's mouth, tongue, and throat had been 
cleansed of the thick mucus. ...Thursday the 18th was called at noon to Christian Daniel. 
When I arrived, I saw for sure that his death was drawing nearer and nearer. He extended his 
hand to me and said something to me which I could no longer understand. I remained with 
him until evening, sang him some verses, and upon departing commended him to the Savior 
and His wounds. Friday the 19th early in the 3rd hour came the blessed Moment when his 
mouth grew pale in Jesus' arm and bosom, and his little soul flew quickly and swiftly into 
Jesus' side. His homegoing was immediately announced in Salem to Br. Tiersch, and he was 
asked to have it announced at the first opportunity also in Bethabara, Bethania, and 
Friedland." Two days later Br. Lorenz came with some single brethren and youths from 
Salem and Bethania to bury Christian Daniel Hartman, and Br. Bachhof read his obituary. 

As we have just seen, death was a "homegoing," a return to Jesus. Sometimes references 
to this homegoing reflect the style of the mid-eighteenth century "Sifting Period," when the 
language of the Moravian Church was rich in sensuous imagery. At other times Bachhof uses 
imagery which tends toward allegory, as in the following entry in the Diary: "We visited the 
elderly Sarah Faber and heard from her that she was very sick. She was looking forward to 
her wedding day (i.e., her homegoing) and as a poor sinner who has nothing other than His 
grace, she was joyfully looking toward her Bridegroom (Christ)." Sr. Faber's joyful 
anticipation bears witness to her faith in the Moravian doctrine. 

On September 3, 1773, Br. Bachhof tells of another homegoing, and the phraseology he 
uses is worth noting. He writes, "We heard that our Sr. A. Eva Beroth blessedly went to 
sleep. She was Joh. Jac. Beroth's wife.. ..On Saturday the 4th her soulless tenement was sown 
at Salem in the God's Acre as the first grain from the Sisters' choir." Implicit here in the 
image of the sowing of grain is the belief that the dead seed holds promise of new life. 

Three centuries before, this belief had sustained the Unity of Brethren in time of 
persecution. In 1773 it sealed the covenant between the founders of Friedberg and the 
Moravian Church. And this belief would maintain that covenant for many generations to 
come. 



Mr. Donald Lineback is a German instructor at Hollins 
College, and his translation of L. C. Bachhof s Diary of 
Friedberg will be published in mid 1974. 

Page 34 




1882 



jfriebbtrg 
iWorabian 
Cfjurcf) 





. *- * 








gfjfii 

21: i=*^j all 

JL I* |-p 



1905 



193' 



Page 35 






This wardrobe probably built by 
Jacob Kraus (1788) is still in 
fine condition at Fried berg. 



One of the most valuable dis- 
coveries of the 200th Anniver- 
sary year is this Coffee Urn 
made by Rudolf Christ in 1821. 



Friedberg's historical collection 
includes: Communion Set (1770), 
Pulpit Bible (1892), German Book 
of Liturgies (1791). 




JOHN C. CROUCH FAMILY 

Flora Kimel, AdaBashford, Mary Robinson, Charles, 
Emma Foltz Beck, Florence Whitlow, Jacob, Amos, 
Arthur, Catherine Caroline Woolsey, Bertha Foltz, 
John C. , James. 





The old weathervane which flew from the 
Friedberg steeple from earliest days. 



Church Furnishings: Communion Table 
and Chair (1770), Small Table Left 
(1770), Secretary (1800), Bookcase over 
Secretary (1830). 



Page 36 




Charles Foltz and wife Lucinda Fishel 
Foltz with son Alva Foltz (our oldest 
present living member). 




THE BUILDING COMMITTEE OF 1904 T.T. Spaugh, 
Lewis Fishel, Francis Foltz, J. A. Hege. 




Russell Kimel, Elmer Essick, Fred Kimel, Aubrey Fishel, Grover Fishel, Coy Fishel, 
Unidentified, Miss Delilah Fishel, Thelma Woosley, Jane Zimmerman, Hilda Kimel Payne, 
Estelle Perryman, Verily Perryman, Josephine Myers, Laura Reich Weaver, Mrs. Carl W. 
Reich, Sr. , Guy Zimmerman, Bill Miller, Joe Craver, Peola Cooper, Eva Kimel, Bennie 
Kimel Weisner, Clyde Fishel, Elmer James, Mr. Carl W. Reich, Sr. 



Page 37 



MAYFEAST 1913 












Salem Band pays a visit to Friedberg in 1885 



Many delicious lovefeast buns were 
baked for the Friedberg congregation 
in this old Bake Oven (1800) once 
located just off the present Mt. Olivet 
Road on the old Hartman Farm. 



The Old Parsonage (the first separate parsonage) still 
stands near the present church. 





Page 38 




jSetgpors 



ENTERPRISE MORAVIAN CHURCH (1899) 





HOPE MORAVIAN CHURCH (1899) 



ADVENT MORAVIAN CHURCH (1899) 



Page 39 




Page 40 



C(0®a|? 



Page 41 



Wi)t JXttesi of Jfrteoberg Cfmrcf) 




i)olp Communion 



On many occasions the congregation has proudly 
called upon an old friend, Bishop Samuel Tesch, 
to assist in serving the holy sacraments. 





THE SCRISTANS - Emory Lineback, Paul Craver, Glenn 
Craver, and C. R. Beeson prepare for this most important 
service of our church. 



Page 42 



Hotoefeasrt 



A lot of work goes on behind the scenes to make 
the Lovefeast one of our most beautiful services. 








.'iiiillllliiiiiniiill 

iiihiii|i' 

..,nllii!J 

THE DIENERS - Minehardt Lambeth (Head Diener), Sam Crater, 
James Dickerson, S. H. Fishel, Arthur Foltz, Frank Hedgecock, 
Ralph Kimel, Charlie Rierson, William Shore, Rex Sink, Roy 
Watkins, Ken Ketner, Ralph Reich, Margaret Foltz, Mary Reich, 
Delia Jones, Pearl Shore, Bonnie Sides, Blanche Watkins, Maxine 
Anderson, Virginia Craver, Ruby Fishel, Doris Foltz. 




Page 43 



a 

P 
t 

t 
s 
m 




Eight children were baptized on Palm Sunday '73 by the Rev. John H. Giesler. 





Mr. & Mrs. J. T. Hopkins present their first 
child a little boy, David Hopkins, for baptism. 



Mr. & Mrs. Terry Payne present their first child 
a little girl, Tiffani Payne, for baptism. 



PRAYER FOR PARENTS 

Dear Heavenly Father, make me a better parent. Teach me to 
understand my children, to listen patiently to what they have to say 
and to answer all their ■questions kindly. Keep me from interrupting 
them, talking back to .them, or contradicting them. Make me as 
courteous to them as I would have them be to me. Give me the courage 
to confess my sins against my children and to ask of them forgiveness 
when I know that I have done wrong. 

Make me so fair and just, so considerate and companionable to 
my children that they will have a genuine esteem for me. Fit me to 
be loved and imitated by my children. 

Amen. 



Page 44 




Nebbing 
Ceremony 




Tim Ragan and Cindy Tesh exit 
after their ceremony on October 
1, 1972. 




Mike Flowe and Jeanette Culler's wedding was held June 26,1971. 




Jerry Shore and Loretta Sides were married February 2,1973. 




Irvin Fishel and Thelma Smothers wedding 
picture from earlier years at Friedberg. 



Page 45 




"(gob's gcre 



» 




Mr. Raymond Foltz with the assistance of his committee, 
Frank Reid and Arthur Foltz, do a lot of work behind the 
scenes to keep this quiet resting place the most beautiful 
spot on our grounds. 



Page 46 




THE BOARD OF ELDERS Emory Lineback, Ray Hartman (V-Chmn), Clyde Sink, Otis Sizemore, 
Rev. John Giesler (Chmn), D. C. Sides, Kent Miller, H. G. Murphy, Archie Foltz, Glenn Craver, 
Paul Craver, C. R. Beeson, Ken Ketner (Sec). 




THE BOARD OF TRUSTEES Charlie Rierson, Jack D. Cockerham, Raymond Brown, Arthur Foltz, 
Gary Murphy, Hal Essick, Sr. , Russell Kimel (Chmn), J. Frank Hedgecock, Jr., (Sec), Charles 
Conrad, Herman Foltz (V -Chmn), Thomas R. Sink, Robert F. Miller, Frank Reid. 



Page 47 






Ray Brown 
Church Treasurer 



Mary Crouse 
Financial Secretary 



Joan Cockerham 
Church Secretary 





Robert Miller 
Treasurer -Building Fund 



Charlie Rierson 
Treasurer-Ben Spaugh Fund 



mwannHj 




Ralph Kimel 

Building & Grounds Chairman 





Hubert Foltz 

Church Council Secretary- 



Otis Sizemore 
Missionary Representative 



Page 48 



Usfjers 




Jimmy Moore, Luther Foltz, Clyde Sink, JohnKimel, Phil Weisner, Mike Hanes, Lon- 
nie Foltz, James Weisner (Asst. Head Usher), Thomas Sink, Kenneth Ketner, Harvey 
Byerly, Bynam Payne, Frank Reid, C. J. Mize, Elwood Foltz, Robert Miller, Bill Shore, 
Troy Jones, C. R. Beeson, Minehardt Lambeth, Mark Kimel, Dennis Faw, Kim Tutterow, 
JackD. Cockerham. 




RETIRED USHERS R. A. Foltz, Russell Miller, Arnold 
Miller, Percy Anderson, Roy Watkins, Emory Lineback. 




Stairway leading to the balcony has 
stood for many years (since 1938). 



Page 49 




THE BOARD OF CHRISTIAN EDUCATION S. H. Fishel, Rev. John Giesler, Joan Tutterow, 
Peggy Essick (Chmn), Ray Hartman (Sunday School Superintendent), Elwood Foltz (Sec), 
Margaret Foltz, Albert Sink, Kim Tutterow. 




BIBLE CLASS Addie Anderson, Percy Anderson, Ruth Cornell, Mary Crouse, Joe Craver, 
Emma Craver, Wiley Culler, Viable Culler, Ella Eller, Lucile Fishel, Alva Foltz, Raymond 
Foltz, Lena Foltz, Arthur A. Foltz, Alice Foltz, Letha Hege, Sadie Jester, Thad Jester, Carol 
Knouse, Delia Knouse, Dorothy Lineback, Emory Lineback, Annie Pearle Beckle, Lessie Myers, 
Maggie Miller, Arnold Miller, Ruby Miller, Russell Miller, Mary Reich, Ralph Reich, James 
Clinard, Mrs. Charles Payne, Rachel McBride, Homer McBride, Maria Swaim, Mary Swaim, 
Flora Swaim, Mae Sink, Mrs. John Rierson, Fred Kimel, Blanche Kimel, Sadie Sutphin, Paul 
Everhart, Ethel Everhart, Bertha Shelton, Mattie Kimel, Ruth Welch, Creed Welch, Flora 
Woosley, Clyde Woosley, Ethel Tesh, Mable Hanes, James Hanes, Hoy Snyder, Mrs. Hoy 
Snyder. 

Page 50 




COVENANT CLASS C. R. Beeson, Helen Beeson, Harvey Byerly, Ruby 
Byerly, Frank Clark, Edith Clark, Wilburn Dean, Elwood Foltz, Herbert 
Foltz, Claudine Foltz, Luther Foltz, Mary Foltz, Travis Hanes, Evva 
Hanes, Oscar Holder, Doris Holder, James Hyatt, Helen Hyatt, Donald 
Johnson, Ralph Kimel, Mary Kimel, Russell Kimel, Mildred Kimel, Esther 
Mendenhall, Mrs. R. J. Mendenhall, Ralph Payne, Frank Reid, Mearlene 
Reid, Clyde Sink, Jr. , Clara Sink, D.C. Sides, Mary Sides, Olin Watkins, 
Ermalee Watkins, Robert Weaver, Laura Weaver, Jasper Younts, Mozelle 
Younts 




FELLOWSHIP CLASS Tom Anderson, Ruth Anderson, J. A. Clinard, 
Bernice Clinard, Charles Conrad, Rosa Conrad, Reede Craver, James 
Dickerson, Ruth Dickerson, Hal Essick,Sr. , Peggy Essick, S. H. Fishel, 
Ruby Fishel, Donald Foltz, Joan Foltz, Herman Foltz, Doris Foltz, 
Hubert Foltz, Kathleen Foltz, Willis Foltz, Margaret Foltz, Minehardt 
Lambeth, Melba Lambeth, C. J. Mize, Opal Mize, Jimmy Moore, Wilma 
Moore, Junior Murphy, Virginia Murphy, Charles Payne, Betty Reich, 
Ed Reich, Charlie Rierson, Barbara Reich, Nancy Rierson, Rex Sink, 
Betty Sink, Jimmy Sutphin, Josephine Sutphin, Harvey Tesh, Frank 
Hedgecock, Betty Hedgecock 



Page 51 




THE POST HI CLASS Mark Kimel, Tanya Kimel, Joel Lambeth, Bonnie Lambeth, Margie 
Everhart, Lynn Foltz, Karen Weisner, Phil Weisner, Linda Weisner, Mike Flowe, Jeanette 
Flowe, Brenda Sides, Robin Sides, Jenny Kessler, Marcia Hedgecock, Richard Reich, Thor 
Weisner, Jean Weisner, Johnny Kimel, Becky Ritch, Vickie Murphy, Gary Murphy, Ruth Little 
Paul Little, Carol Snyder, Larry Snyder, Mike Reich, David Surridge, Bea Kessler, Wilma 
Culler, Carmel Livengood, Robert Miller, Ralph Surridge 







YOUNG ADULT CLASS Hugh Bryson, Joan Bryson, Brenda Clark, Phil Clark, Jack Cocker- 
ham, Joan Cockerham, Patty Essie, Linda Everhart, Steve Everhart, Bill Flynt, Archie 
Foltz, May Dell Foltz, Kent Miller, Margaret Miller, Joy Reich, Sam Reich, Merle Scott, 
Kenneth Scott, Judy Sink, Thomas Sink, Albert Sink, Ronna Sink, Dennis Stutts, Judy 
Stutts, Nancy Tesh, Gail Ketner, Ken Ketner, Bruner Sides, Linda Sides, Pat Lambeth, 
Ray Lambeth, Terry Payne, Judy Payne, Charles Redden, Virginia Craver, Kim Tutterow, 
Joan Tutterow, Otis Sizemore, Ralph Surridge 



Page 52 




WILLING WORKERS CLASS Annie Chadwick, Jack Q. Cockerham, Ann 
Cockerham, Paul Craver, Elizabeth Craver, Sam Crater, Sr. , Kathryn 
Crater, Mildred Essick, Irvin Fishel, Thelma Fishel, Preston Hege, 
Thelma Hege, Troy Jones, Delia Jones, Vance Jones, Lillian Jones, 
Clarence Livengood, Jr. , Francis Mendenhall, Earsley Mendenhall, Bynum 
Payne, Hilda Payne, Paul Payne, Grace Payne, Clifford Padgett, Mary 
Padgett, Howard Penry, Ella Mae Penry, Lema Snyder, Bill Shore, Pearl 
Shore, Fred Tesh, Margaret Tesh, Roy Watkins, Blanche Watkins, Guy 
Zimmerman, James Weisner, Bennie Weisner 




SENIOR HIGHS Laura Brown, Bonnie Casey, Franklin Clark, Deanna 
Dickerson, Mike Hanes, Phillip Hedgecock, Mike Lambeth, Frank Miller, 
Debbie Mize, Cathy Moore, Sandra Reich, Vicky Sink, Barbara Giesler 



Page 53 




NURSERY I Julia Foltz, Kathy Knouse, Timmy Lawson, David Bryson, 
Danny Everhart, Stephane Murphy, Andrew Foltz, Christy Sink, David 
Hopkins, Susan Clark; NURSEY II Jennifer Nifong, Caroline Hanes, 
Sandra Craver, Kevin Crater, Kim Scott, Doug Everhart, Cathy Reich, 
Julie McBride, Allen Foltz, David Sink, Eric Scott, Anne Hill, Carol 
Hutchins, Reva Miller, Peggy Lawson, Alice Walser, Ruby Clinard 




KINDERGARTEN Leslie Flynt, Todd Lambeth, Martin Miller, Lisa 
Essie, Mark Clinard, David Everhart, Carrie Foltz, Laurie Foltz, Leah 
Lawson, Doug Nifong, Phillip Reich, Norman Sutphin, Cindy Stutts, Stacy 
Payne, Joann Tesh, Opal Mize, Virginia Murphy, Nancy Tesh 



Page 54 




PRIMARY DEPARTMENT Lisa Clark, Richard Craver, Randy McBride, Angela Scott, 
Kelly Tutterow, Sara Nichols, Ronnie Foltz, Melissa Mize, Michele Foltz, Karen 
Crater, Kim Knouse, Kenan Dickerson, Joe Bryson, Angela Fishel, Kenny Hutchens, 
Randy Sides, Charlie Essie, Brian Brinkley, Tonya Calcutt, Bruce Hill, Charles Ketner, 
Suzanne Ketner, Keith Scott, Lorraine Sutphin, James Sizemore, Karen Ballou, Janet 
Johnson, Diane Foltz, Linda Weaver, Nancy Nichols, Joan Tutterow, Joan Cockerham 




JUNIOR DEPARTMENT Cindy Giesler, Melinda Sink, Melissa Sizemore, Donald Cocker- 
ham, Penny Clinard, Mikie Foltz, Jonathan Hanes, Tamara Hurd, Lisa Clinard, Melissa 
Cockerham, Chris Conrad, Lisa Hutchens, Lisa Johnson, Sandy Miller, Carolyn Reich, 
Shannon Sizemore, Becky Giesler, Nathan Anderson; Pearl Craver, Margaret Brown, 
Melba Lambeth, Betty Hedgecock, Ruby Fishel 



Page 55 




JUNIOR HIGH GIRLS - Cheryl Sink, Janet Sink, 
Rita Foltz, Melanie Sizemore, Ann Miller, 
Robin Johnson, Martha Shore, Pam Rierson, 
Lisa Rierson, Jane Tesh, RoseMary Foltz, 
Judith Moore, Debby Giesler, Marsha Clinard; 
Mary Sides, Bennie Weisner, Bordie Belle 
Hartman 



JUNIOR HIGH BOYS - Edward Brown, Jeff Essick, 
Wesley Brown, Randall Anderson, Mike Foltz, 
Mark Lawson, Steve Jackson, Chris Giesler, 
Bobby Hutchins, Gary Sides; Raymond Brown, 
Glenn Craver 




Page 56 



!?outf) 







The young people enjoy many varied activities during the church 
year which help them gain funds for worthwhile projects and develope 
an understanding for real Christian Fellowship. 




Page 57 




Jfflen'g 
jfellotosfnp 



This group of men was just organized in 1973 although 
they have been active for many years as an unofficial 
organization. 



The Sunday morning breakfast has 
become a real fellowship of the 
men as they lean back after a good 
meal here to listen to one of Fried - 
berg's men in the ministry, Rev. 
Lewis Swaim. 






For many years the men of the congregation have taken the responsibility of keeping the grounds and buildings in top 
condition. Here under the direction of the Caretaker Committee, a work day was planned to clean out the woods 
and area at the Pavilion. 



Page 58 



Somen's 
jfellotosffnp 





!■••. 



CIRCLE #1 



CIRCLE #2 





CIRCLE #3 



CIRCLE #4 




CIRCLE #5 



Page 59 






The largest project for the Women's Fellow- 
ship is the delicious Ham & Chicken Pie 
Suppers put on twice each year to raise funds 
for worthwhile projects that the ladies wish 
to support. 






The new facilities of our Fellow- 
ship Hall and Kitchen have made 
this project much more enjoyable 
for all. Here the ladies are seen 
preparing the supper in the old 
kitchen below the old sanctuary. 




Page 60 




tKrefe 

jfrom jfriebberg 

Uto Petfjatmra 



On Easter Monday 1973 a small band of men, women, and 
children set out on a hike from Friedberg Church to the 
Bethabara Church reenacting the trek of earlier years when 
the communicant members had to walk to Bethabara to 
receive Holy Communion because there was no minister 
in the Friedberg Congregation. 






<*•%* 



The following people made the walk: Rev. John H. Giesler, Mike Flowe, Jeanette Flowe, Rebecca Giesler, Chris Giesler, 
Josephine Sutphin, James Sutphin, Lorraine Sutphin, Norman Sutphin, Sadie Sutphin, Melanie Sizemore, Cathy Moore, 
Carolyn Reich, Cindy Giesler, D. C. Sides, Mary Sides, Marica Hedgecock, Bill Roesel, Debby Giesler, John Foltz, Barbara 
Giesler, Ruby Fishel, Angela Fishel, Melba Lambeth, Minehardt Lambeth, Mike Lambeth, Judith Moore, Lisa Johnson, Fred 
Kimel, Blanche Kimel, Jonathan Hanes, Steve Jackson, Shannon Sizemore, Melissa Sizemore, Beth Walters, Donna McKenny, 
Junior Murphy, Virginia Murphy, Gary Murphy, Bennie Weisner, Sandy Miller, Chris Whicker, Kathy Sides , Ann Miller, Janet 
Sink, Eric Scott, Max Spach, Jim Culler, Scott Hewitt, Richard Reich, Otis Sizemore, Beverly Sizemore, Lu Ann Gentry, 
James Sizemore, Mildred Martin. 



Page 61 




Mr . Jerry V. Jones 
Choir Director - Organist 



f- Of 

m w», -•".-.' tJ> •as**'!?] 



iHugtc 



,_ 




THE MUSIC COMMITTEE Otis Sizemore, Lucile Fishel, Bennie 
Weisner, Irvin Fishel, Rev. John Giesler, Herman Foltz 



Page 62 




THE ADULT CHANCEL CHOIR 
Jenny Kessler, Bennie Weisner, Cathy Moore, Judith Moore, Wilma Moore, Mary Sides, Betty Reich, Clara Sink, 
Debby Giesler, Barbara Giesler, Jeanette Culler, Beverly Sizemore, Marcia Hedgecock, Barbara Reich, Bonnie Sides, 
Brenda Sides, Brenda Clark, Bea Kessler, Virginia Murphy, Ramona Hanes, Richard Reich, Mike Flowe, Boone Sides, 
Kent Miller, Otis Sizemore, Franklin Clark, Clarence Livengood, Jr. , Fred Culler 



THE ENGLISH HANDBELL CHOIR 
Melba Lambeth, May Dell Foltz, Barbara Giesler, Thelma Fishel, Lucile Fishel, Virginia Murphy, Betty Reich, 
Kathleen Foltz, Hubert Foltz. 




Page 63 




ftfje William 3 . Jfisfftcl 
Jflemortal pelte 



This was the first year of our English Handbell program at Fried- 
berg Church, and it was made possible through the donation of 
the beautiful four octave (49 bells) set of Schulmerich bells in 
memory of the late William J. Fishel. Since that time we have 
organized two choirs which were active in all of the festival 
occasions. A third group, The Belltones, will be introduced in 
the Fall of 1973. 



William J. Fishel 




The Young Carillons play here for the 200th Anniversary celebration during the first week of 
April 1973. 



Page 64 




THE YOUNG CARILLIONS 
Mike Lambeth, Cathy Moore, Gary Sides, Diane Foltz, Martha Shore, JeffEssick, Steve Jackson, 
Rita Foltz, Mike Foltz, Judith Moore, Debby Giesler, Chris Giesler, Phillip Hedgecock, Deanna Dick - 
erson, Robin Johnson, Melanie Sizemore. 




The Young Carillons played this year for the first time on the front 
lawn for the Easter morning Graveyard Service. 



Page 65 




THE JUNIOR CHANCEL CHOIR 

Melissa Sizemore, Lisa Johnson, Shannon Sizemore, Lorraine Sutphin, Melissa 
Cockerham, Angela Fishel, Becky Giesler, Carolyn Reich, Michele Foltz, Suzzane 
Ketner, Bruce Hill, Charles Ketner, Donald Cockerham, Jonathan Hanes, James 
Sizemore, Cindy Giesler, Tamara Hurd, Mikie Foltz, Karen Crater, Melissa Mize, 
Ronnie Foltz, Kathy Sides. 





The choirs put in a lot of time and hard work 
to make each service more beautiful than the last 
and more acceptable in the sight of God. For" 
we must never forget that after His gift to us, 
nothing is too great a gift for Him. 



Page 66 



Irvin Fishel 
Band Leader 



tKfje Jfrtebberg Casiter fBanb 





Hal Essick 
Band Leader 





SAM FORT JR. 
BAND DIRECTOR 

LILLIAN FORT 
ASSISTING DIRECTOR 



Grover Fishel, J. F. Hedgecock, Sr. , Andrea Adams, Ann Adams, Donald Cockerham, Jeff Essick, Alberta Foltz, 
Dianne Foltz, Hubert Foltz, Lonnie Foltz, Mikie Foltz, Rita Foltz, Willis Foltz, Mike Foltz, John Giesler, Chris Giesler, 
Debby Giesler, J. F. Hedgecock, Jr., Phillip Hedgecock, Jonathan Hanes, Steve Jackson, John Kimel, Mike Lambeth, 
Minehardt Lambeth, Emory Lineback, Randy Mabe, Verge Nifong, Barbara Rierson, Clyde Sink, Otis Sizemore, Billy 
Tesh, Dale Tesh, James Tesh, Jerry Tesh, Jimmy Tesh, Nancy Tesh, Roxie Tesh, Woody Tesh, Woodrow Tesh, Christian 
Weber, Bruce Weber, Dennis Fort, Hubert Fort. 



Page 67 




Special ££>erbice$ 



Caster 



"It was Easter. 

And when I heard the church bells ring, 

I thought I heard the Voice of God." 





Page 68 







Page 69 



Special ikrtotces; 





"And she shall bring forth a son, and thou shalt call his name Jesus: 
for He shall save His people from their sins." 




Page 70 



c 

r 
i 

t 

m 
a 





i ' 


'■■'.■> 


^v. 




fir. 




IT' ■ ' . 

• 





Page 71 




Each year at Christmas, the choirs combine to bring the story of our Savior's birth closer to the hearts and minds 
of the Friedberg family. 



Special ikririces; 



The Women's Fellowship has the Privilege of preparing the 
beeswax candles with red trim for the two Lovefeasts on 
Christmas Eve. 




"The Lovefeast" , painting by Margaret 
Kaye Everhart, captures the beauty and 
fellowship of the Christmas Eve Love- 
feast and Candlelight Service. 



Page 72 



I 






A^v 






7 i < .> 









COME LORD JESUS 
OUR CUES 
AND BLESS THE 

6IFTS BEST 




tt*A*Aitf faui.llil 










m 

1 


1 

1 
I 

1 - 

I 
1 




.•«'S! 


i 

j 
, * 




i 
« i 

•i 

»'.*fl 


I < 





1 
> 




I 
■ 




• 


. 



• ' 






«e* 



4 



Special ^crtoiceg 

200tf) 

&nmbersarp 
Hobefeast 

Sprtl 4, 1973 




A special part of the celebration of Friedberg's 200th 
Anniversary was the Lovefeast held during anniversary 
week. The Dieners dressed in costumes of the seven- 
teenth century to serve this most important festival 
lovefeast. 




r\ 



Page 74 




ptcial ikrbtces 

©utboor 
Jfcsfttbal 



A tradition in the making, the Outdoor Festivals have become a special part of Friedberg's 
church year. Each fall and spring the congregation gathers on the back lawn of the church for 
an inspirational service of music and message. This past spring of 1973 an invitation was 
extended to the Mayor's Majority as seen above. 




Page 75 




t^^^^^Uttf 



The present parsonage built in 1958 is just a few yards from the Friedberg Church. 



parsonage 
Jfamilp 




The Rev. John H. Giesler and his wife Barbara and their children 
Debby, Cindy, Becky, and Chris. 

Page 76 



&f)e Jfrtebberg Jfamtlp 




Dallas & Maxine Anderson 



Percy &c Addie Anderson 




Thomas & Ruth Mabe Anderson 
Randall & Nathan 






Wayne & Linda Anderson 



Steve & Patricia Atkins 



Clay & Annie Pearl Beckel 






C. R. & Helen Beeson 



James & Helen Boles 



Tom & Patricia Brittain 







A 






^'.-..-'■.:5^ml/..v^ 1* 




Ray & Margaret Brown 
Laura, Edward & Wesley 



Hugh & Joan Bryson 
Joe & David 





Harvey & Ruby Byerly 





■ ■ ■■ 

:-™ - 


V ^ 






Leon & Bonnie Byerly 
Tonya 



Johnny & Margaret Carruthers 



Frank &t Edith Clark 
Franklin 



Philip h Brenda Clark 
Lisa 8* Su s an 



Page 77 







James Clinard 




Ruby Clinard 
Lisa 



r i 




Jack Q. &c Ann Cockerham 




Jack D. & Joan Cockerham 
Melissa & Donald 



Charles & Rosa Mae Conrad 
Chris 




Pearl Craver, Ruth Cornell, 
Reede Craver 



X 




G. B. & Ruth Craft 




Sam &; Katlierine Crater, Sr, 




Sam &c Sue Crater, Jr. 
Karen, Kevin &c Kathy 



^W^E^*, 





Joe & Emma Lee Craver Paul & Elizabeth Crave: 



Steve Craver 



Glenn & Virginia Craver 
Richard & Sandra 




Mary Crouse 



James & Wilma Culler 



Wiley & Mable Culler 



Page 78 



Wilburn Dean 



James & Ruth Dickerson 
Deanna & Kenan 



Ella May Eller 




Hal &c Peggy Essick, Sr. 
Joel & Jeff 




Hal &: Deborah Essick, Jr. 




Mildred Essick 




Joe 8t Margaret Everhart 
Margie & Joey 




Steve &t Linda Everhart 
David, Douglas & Daniel 




Dennis Faw 







Aaron &t Juanita Fishel 
Dickie New so m 




Cromer &c Virginia Fishel 




Grace Fishel 




Gray Sr Bonnie Fishel 
Stephen 



Irvin &. Thelm.a, Eishei 




▲i 



. Jo,e -Fishel 




Luna Fishel 



Page 79 



Minehardt & Jeannie Fishel S. H. &: Ruby Fishel, Jr. 

Sanford, 111 & Angela 



Viola Fishel 



Lucile Fishel 




Mike & Jeanette Flowe 




Billy & Rachel Flynt 
Leslie 



Arthur & Alice Foltz 




Alva Foltz 




Archie & May Dell Foltz 
Laurie & Allen 




Aubrey & Doris Foltz 
Jane & Kristen 




Charles & Nancy Foltz 
Donna & Pamela 




Donald & Joan Foltz 
Mike h Michelle 



Elwood & Lorraine Foltz 




Herman &t Doris Foltz 




Hubert & Kathleen Foltz 
Dianne &c Rita 



Lonnie & Alberta Foltz 
Mikie & Ronnie 



Page 80 




Luther & Mary Foltz 



Raymond & Lena Foltz 



Richard & Lynn Foltz 
Andrew 



\ 




Willis & Margaret Foltz 
Carrie & Julie 






Lula Gregg 



James &c Mabel Hanes 



Travis & Evva Hanes 
Jonathan 8c Caroline 




Ray & Bordie Bell Hartman 



Elva Hege 




Ronnie &t Brenda Hartman 



Frank &l Betty Hedgecock, Jr. 
Marcia h Phillip 




Letha Hege 



Judy Herman 
Donny 




Albert & Anne Hill 
Bruce 




Oscar & Doris Holder 



J. T. & Dru Hopkins 



Page 81 




Herbert & Drue Hurd 

Tamar a 




Troy & Delia Jones 



George & Ruth Jackson, David, Steve, 
Debbie, Gary & Jeff 








Vance & Lillian Jones 



Donald &t Janet Johnson 
Lisa 




Robert & Judy Joyce 



■ : :„, K . / 



Bea Kessler 
Jenny 




Wsm 



Kenneth & Gail Ketner 
Suzanne &c Charles 




Ralph & Mary Kim el 
Tanya 




Delia Knouse 




Dwain &: Janice Kimel 




Russell & Mildred Kimel 
Mark & John 




Donald & Audrey Koontz 



*0S> 



«*ll 



itA 



Mattie Kimel 




Bobby & Carol Knouse 
Kim & Kathy 



mm 






r\ 








fetj 


fhmF 








m~ 






-V^^ 


J^--'^ ■ 




A 


1 M ^ 


* 


" .^.-. 


M 


\ M A 


mU- 


A 


If 


m 



Minehardt & Melba Lambeth 
Mike 



Page 82 




Ray & Pat Lambeth 
Todd 




Carl & Peggy Lawson 
Mark, Leah & Timothy 



Paul & Ruth Little 







Clarence & Carmel Livengood 




David &c Nancylynn Lockman 
Tamara 




' iCaJ 



Joe & Betty Maranville 
Teja 





Le Vaughn & Judy Maranville Esther Mendenhall Francis 8r Earsley Mendenhall Luna Mendenhall 

Vonda Mia 




Arnold & Maggie Miller 




Kent &c Margaret Miller 
Martin & Ann 




Robert & Reva Miller 
Frank, Ann &t Sandy 




Russell & Ruby Miller 




C. J. k Opal Mize 

Carole, Debra & Melissa 




Jimmy &t Wilma Moore 
Cathy & Judith 



Page 83 




Roger & Eddis Mullis 



L-essie Myers 



Wayne &c Gayl Nifong 
Douglas, Jennifer, 
Rebecca & Stephen 





. 



Gary & Vickie Murphy 
Stephanie 




Donald 8c Nancy Nichols 
Gregory Casey, Bonnie 
Casey, Sara Nichols 




Clifford & Mary Padgett 




MUM 

Bynum & Hilda^Payne 



H. G. & Virginia Murphy 




Henry & Maude Nifong 




Coy & Eunice Parnell 




Mary Francis Payne 



Johnny &t Ramona Payne 
Stacy 



Larry & Desdemona Payne 
Annette 



* .. 



%F <^F\ 




Paul & Grace Payne 



Ralph & Lemma Payne 
Donald 



Howard & Ella Mae Penry 



Page 84 



... 




Tim & Cindy Ragan 




Martin & Brenda Sue Reece 



3 I 


/ 1- v Jre j 




- ■ 


\/' ' I 


■:': 



Betty Reich, Richard 
Sandra & Carolyn 




Ed & Barbara Reich 
Mike 




Ralph & Mary Reich 




Sam & Joy Reich 
Phillip, Catherine 
& Anna 




Robert & Barbara Rogers 



Roxanne Rogers 



Frank & Mearlene Reid 




Kenneth & Merle Scott 
Keith, Angela & 
Kimberly 




Bertha Shelton 




Ronald Shell 




Jerry & Loretta Shore 




Steve Shell 




Bill & Pearl Shore 
Martha 



Page 85 



k «■» «fe, . 




-1 



«A^ 



Fannie Shore 




Boone & Mary Sides 




Homer &t Bonnie Sides 

Debra 




Paul & Perry Sides 




Polly Sides, Brenda 
Freddie &c Kathy 




rt 



Ricky Sides 




Robin Sides 



Albert & Ronna Sink 
Kristle Lee 




Clyde &t Clara Sink, Jr 



Mae Sink 




Rex & Betty Sink, Vicky, 
Cheryl, Janet & Melinda 




Thomas & Judith Sink 
David 




Otis & Beverly Sizemore, Melanie, 
Shannon, Melissa & Jarnes 






Emory & Sarah Snyder 



Hoy & Annie Snyder 



Lema Snyder 



Page 86 




Larry & Carol Snyder 




Dennis & Judith Stutts 
Cynthia 




John & Mary Spradlin 
Patty 



w 

$ 




'*' lU 



fa* 



Ralph & Myrtle Surridge 
David 




Ronald & Cornelia Staker 




•as"*""****! 



James & Josephine Sutphin 
Lorraine & Norman 




Roy h. Sadie Sutphin 



Flora Swaim 



Mary Swaim 



Maria Swaim 




Fred & Margaret Tesh 



Ethel Tesh 




Larry & Nancy Tesh 
Joann 




Luther h. Ruby Tesh 




3 »*i~*f**'A~ 



Jerry & Gail Tolley 




Kim & Joan Tuttero\ 
Kelly 



Page 87 





"** WW 



Olin & Ermalee Watkins 



Roy & Blanche Watkins 



Alice Walser 




David & Linda Sue Watkins 




Lou 8t Judy Weisner 
Donna 




Thor & Jean Weisner 




Clyde & Flore Woosley 




Robert & Laura Weaver 
Linda 



Jasper & Mozelle Younts 



Page 88 



James & Bennie Weisner 
Karen 





SERVICE 



FUNERAL DIRECTORS 



DEPENDABLE SERVICE SINCE 1858 



722-6101 

120 S. Main St. 

2951 Reynolda Rd. 

Winston-Salem, N. C. 



766-4714 
Middlebrook Dr. 
Clemmons, N. C. 






AMERICAN CHURCH DIRECTORIES 

Southgate Shopping Center 
Thomasville, N.C. 




MORAVIAN SUGAR CRISPS CO. 

Rt. #2 Clemmons, N.C. 27012 
Phone 764-1402 



% foam 



"Your Weekly Newspaper" 

Box 765 Clemmons, N.C. 

Phone 766-5505 



SIDES NURSERY 

Office Phone 764-1880 

Retail Sales Yard - Fishel Road 

Phone 784-0450 



=35= 



- if •* - 



=9 t ■> *- 



=?fe 



=5fc 



^Jfc 



Page 89 



=S£= 



^e= 



=5£= 



^£= 



=>«= 



=^e= 



MR. BIG FOOD STORE 

Cardinal Shopping Center 
Ebert Street Ext. 



CARMEL'S BEAUTY SHOP 

Friedberg Church Road 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 



FOLTZ 



CONCRETE PIPE COMPANY 



Highway #150 South 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 



COCKERHAM-CALAWAY 
FURNITURE CO. 

"A Complete Line Of Home Furnishings" 

3931 South Main Street 

Phone 788-2261 



CARESS FLOWER SHOP 

Cloverdale Plaza Shopping Center 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 



CARL'S CARPET MART 

New Lexington Road 
Winston-Salem, N.C. 



WILSHIRE PHILLIPS 66 

"Complete Auto Service" 
3715 Peters Creek Pkwy. 



=3fc 



Jt 



iSfc; 



i3fc; 



=Sfe 



=5fc 



Page 90 



=ae= 



=ss= 



=a <. j<. it j g= 



=5£= 



CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 200th ANNIVERSARY 



Commercial Warehouse Inc 



105 Patterson Avenue 



Winston-Salem, N.C. 




=>*= 



=3«= 



=9fe 



=3?= 



d>fc: 



Page 91 



, <r— a e= 



=5€= 



=S <. i <= 



WELCOME OIL CO. 



P.O. Box 155 



Welcome, N.C. 



=3 i Ji ^ i -36= 



=9 1. =96= 



L. A. REYNOLDS COMPANY 

Grading-Landscaping 

Paving-Excavating 

Phone 722-7152 




'c/ed 




zt< 



d£ 



PARKWAY PLA2A SHOPPING CENTER 



Phone 723-1841 



f^m^M^ [OTC3§[§C3Y 



& ®m®m mmm 



Highway #150 South 

Winston-Salem, N.C. 

PHone 764-2758 



= H ifr K JC M X K i f = *- — if if - > f- 



=5fc 



Page 92 



: 


* it st st »t it »t i 

: i 


MOORE MUSIC COMPANY 


JAYE'S BIKE SHOP 


Toney Yancy - Allen Organs 


"Your Total Concept Schwinn Dealer" 1 


615 West Market St. 


3508 Rosemont Drive 


- Greensboro, N.C. 

u 
n 


Phone 788-4341 . 

J 

ft 


'Ca ' 


i 


\^\x rncicie 1408 s . stradford Road 






: 1— I ||V Winston-Salem, N.C. 


FAIRBOD TRAILER SALES 


1 lUlAoc 


Hwy. 150 South 


RESTAURANT 


Peters Creek Pkwy. Ext. : 


j£%_ J^jlii 


Phone 919 764-0140 
Winston-Salem, N.C. J 


i i^ts^^^^^? ^\ 




jf^^F^uvWTWJ 


. jr J> v^ \J^ 


« 

* 




u 


t 
i 


WATKINS TAX SERVICE 




3345 Old Salisbury Rd. 




CLEMMONS HARDWARE 




> Clemmons, N.C. 


1 


WESTERN AUTO STORE 


K & W CAFETERIAS 


Clemmons, N.C. 


Parkway Plaza-Knollwood St. 


! WILSON'S FLOWER SHOP 


Coliseum Dr. 


Clemmons, N.C. 




JI LE KE SPORT SUPPLY, INC. 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 


Ebert Street Ext. 


tl 


» Winston-Salem, N.C. 


a 


SNYDER'S FUEL OIL SERVICE 




Hickory Tree Road 




Phone 764-2541 
i 

WELCOME MILLING COMPANY 


u 
a 




Welcome, N.C. 


■ 


, EDWARDS METAL SHOP. INC. 


< 


1 Heating & Air Cond. , Contractor 


CARPENTER'S FLOWER SHOP 




2645 South Main 


VILLAGE RESTAURANT 


1980 S. Hawthorn Rd. 


Clemmons Village Shopping Center 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 


, Clemmons, N.C. 


t 


i 


ADAMS' FLORIST 1 


SOUTHERN CHRYSLER-PLYMOUTH 


Shallowford Road 


"Home Of Red Carpet Service" 


Lewisville, N.C. 


High Point, N.C. 




• 

SMITH VENETIAN BLIND CO. 


HUBBARD REALTY ; 


& INSURANCE CO. 


2615 Stradford Road SW 


629 Peters Creek Parkway 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 


. KONNOAK FOOD MARKET 


FOLTZ-ETNA SERVICE STATION J 


3600 South Main Street 


Herbert & Eddie Foltz 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 

4 *e * se w « * « 


714 Peters Creek Parkway 
« m m « * w s" 



Page 93 



=m a t x it > c i<r xr~ i e= k n at n =^€= 



: 


i 

i 


CONGRATULATIONS ON YOUR 200th ANNIVERSARY 

: \ 


Floyd S. B 

V 

n 


« 
t 

urge Construction Co. 


"We are proud to have been a part of your heritage. " 

d 
n * 




423 Dean Street , 


ii 

n 


Winston-Salem, N.C. 

« 

< 


If 

j» 


ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS ! 


JIM SUTPHIN 


HISTORICAL PICTURES 


Artist 


NOT OTHERWISE ACKNOWLEDGED 


it 


C. J. Livengood, Jr. « 


MARGARET KAYE 


Emory Lineback 


Artist 


Mary Sides 




Maria Swaim 


! BRUCE CAMPBELL 


Rev. James E. Hall « 


Photographer 






200th ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE 


COPPEDGE STUDIOS 




> Photography 


Clarence Livengood ' 




Doris Foltz 


MORAVIAN ARCHIVES 


Mary Crouse 


SOUTHERN PROVINCE 


Mary Sides 


>! Historical Materials 


John Giesler ' 




Lucile Fishel 


BOARD OF TRUSTEES 


Paul Craver 


FRIEDBERG CHURCH 


, 


■ Minister's Portraits 


BICENTENNIAL BOOK COMMITTEE 


1 BRAD RAUSCHENBERG 


Virginia Murphy 


Photographic Restoration 


Kent Miller J 


> Photographer 


Otis Sizemore 




Bea Kessler 


DAVID HAUSER 


Brenda Clark 


1 Photographer - The Courier 


Jerry Jones t 


AMERICAN CHURCH DIRECTORIES THE FRIEDBERG CONGREGATION 


Bruce & Jo Campbell 






Many thanks to the entire con- , 


' JOAN COCKERHAM 


gregation for their support in making this 


Typist 
I *e it *e v; ?i^ 


book possible. 
»t w »e sf if »e 3f if Y 



Page 94 



©M€CTO&!9~1973 



ANDERSON, Dal las G. 
Maxine McNei I 

ANDERSON, Mrs. H. Russel I 

ANDERSON, Percy G. 
Addie Shore 

ANDERSON, Thomas S. 
Ruth Mabe 
Randal I 
Nathan 

ANDERSON, D. Wayne 

ATKINS, Mrs. Steve 
(Patricia Fishel ) 

BARGOIL, Levi J. 
Paul i ne Cockerham 
Paul 
George 
Michael 

BECKEL, Clay E. 

Annie Pearl Painter 

BEESON, C. R., Jr. 
Helen Ogburn 

BEESON, James 0. 



BROWN, Raymond E. 
Margaret Craver 
Laura 
Edward 
Wes I ey 

BRYSON, Hugh M. 
Joan Zimmerman 
Joseph 
Davi d 

BUMGARNER, Mrs. Wi ley T. 
(Margaret Gi les) 

BURTON, Mrs. Hi lary J . 
(Myrtle Mi I ler) 

BYERLY, Harvey 
Ruby Beckel 

BYERLY, J. Fred 
Sina Fishel 

BYERLY, Leon F. 
Bonnie McNei I I 
Tonya 

CARRUTHERS, John W., Jr. 
Margaret Essick 

CARSWELL, Steve T. 



BERGLAND, Mrs. Marvin 
(Martha Hutch ins) 



CHADWICK, Mrs. Howard K. 
(Annie Terrel I ) 



B0DSF0RD, Mrs. Wi I I iam C. 
(Janet Vernon) 

BOLES, James 
Helen Kimel 



CHARLES, Marvin F, 

CLARK, Frank L. 

Edith Myers 

Frankl i n 



BREWER, Mrs. James J . 
(01 i via Hartman) 

BRITTAIN, Thomas H. 
Patricia Crater 



CLARK, Roger 

CLARK, Phi I ip A. 
Brenda Vanhoy 
Li sa 
Susan 



Page 95 



CLINARD, Jul ius A. (Bud) 
Bern ice Hege 
MarSha 
Penny 
Mark 



CRAVER, Miss Pearl e 

CREED, Michael W. 
Linda Livengood 
Derek 



CLINARD, James G. 
Dorothy 
Ruby 

CLODFELTER, Mrs. L. C. 
(Alma Fishel ) 

COCKERHAM, Jack D. 
Joan Fa i re I oth 
Me I i ssa 
Dona I d 

COCKERHAM, Jack Q. 
Ann Tesh 

CONRAD, Charles A. 
Rosa Mae Fishel 
Timothy 
Chris 

CORNELL, Mrs. George J 
(Ruth Craver) 

CRAFT, Mrs. G. B. 
(Ruth Fishel) 

CRANDALL, Fred E. 
Mary Gun lock 

CRATER, Sam, Jr. 
Karen 
Kevi n 
Kathy 

CRATER, Sam, Sr. 
Catherine Hartman 

CRAVER, Glenn W. 
Vi rgi n ia Havener 
Richard 
Sandra 

CRAVER, H. Reede 

CRAVER, Joseph C. 
Emma Lee Tesch 

CRAVER, Paul E. 
El izabeth Faw 
Steve 



CROUCH, Mrs. Arthur 
(Erma Crouse) 

CROUSE, Miss Mary 

CULLER, Fred M. 

CULLER, James M. 
Wi I ma Pope 

CULLER, Wi ley H. 
Mable Mize 

DAVIS, Mrs. W. Clyde 
(01 I ie Foltz) 

DEAN, Wi I burn R. 

DICKERSON, James E. 
Ruth Reich 
Deanna 
Kenan 

DURIE, Carl S. 
Grace Wood 

ELLER, Mrs. Fred 
(Ella May Myers) 

ERNST, Luther H. 

ERVIN, Carlos B. 
I rene Everhart 
Spencer 

ERVIN, Sande L. 

ESSICK, Mrs. Elmer R. 
(Mi Idred Mi I ler) 

ESSICK, Hal E., Jr. 
Deborah Kimel 

ESSICK, Hal E., Sr. 
Peggy Isaacs 
Joel 
Jeff 

EVERHART, A. Paul 
Ethel Myers 



Page 96 



EVERHART, Joe L. 
Margaret Knouse 
Margie 
Joey 

EVERHART, Stephen D. 
Linda Younts 
Davi d 
Doug I as 
Dan iel 

FAW, Dennis B. 

FISHEL, Aaron J. 
Juanita Glenn 
Dickie Newsom 

FISHEL, Clyde 
Mertie A I I en 

FISHEL, Coy 

FISHEL, Cromer H. 
Vi rginia Ni fong 

FISHEL, David E. 
Bettie Mize 

FISHEL, Elra 0. 

FISHEL, Ernest W. 
Ethel Shore 

FISHEL, Miss Flora 

FISHEL, Miss Grace 

FISHEL, Mrs. Howard E. 
(Mi Idred Tunnel I ) 

FISHEL, Irvin W. 
The I ma Smothers 

FISHEL, Joseph M., Jr. 
Ava Broughton 

FISHEL, Joseph M., Sr. 

FISHEL, Miss Luna 

FISHEL, I . Manley 

FISHEL, Minehardt H. 

FISHEL, R. Gray 
Stephen 



FISHEL, Roger S. 
Patricia Smith 
Charles 
Chri s 
Cheryl 

FISHEL, S. H., Jr. 
Ruby Sink 
Sanford, I I I 
Ange I a 

FISHEL, Sidney A. 
Ginger Smith 
Gregory 

FISHEL, Mrs. Wi I I i am A, 
(Viola Jones) 

FISHEL, Mrs. Wi 1 I lam J, 
(Luci le Felmet) 

FLOWE, G. Michael, I I 
Jeanette Cu I ler 

FLYNT, Bi I ly C. 
Lesl ie 

FOLTZ, A I I ie E. 
Ruby Mustin 

FOLTZ, Alva E. 

FOLTZ, Mrs. A. M. 
(Ida Sink) 

FOLTZ, Archie L. 
May Del I Fi sher 
Laurie 
Al len 

FOLTZ, Arthur A. 
Al ice Beckel 

FOLTZ, Aubrey R. 
Doris Crater 
Jane 
Kristen 

FOLTZ, Charles A. 
Nancy Settle 
Donna 
Pamel a 

FOLTZ, Donald L. 
Joan Michael 
Michael 
Michel le 



Page 97 



FOLTZ, El wood A. 
Lorrai ne Terre I I 



GREGG, Mrs. Anderson 
(Lu la Mae Kimel ) 



FOLTZ, Emery E. 
Carrie Hege 

FOLTZ, Herbert E. 
Claudine Joyner 
Edward 
Rosemary 

FOLTZ, Herman E. 
Doris Beauchamp 
Lynne 
Susan 

FOLTZ, Hubert E. 
Kathleen Boyer 
Di anne 
Rita 

FOLTZ, Lonnie E. 
Alberta Hayes 
Mi kie 
Ronn ie 

FOLTZ, Luther S. 
Mary Spaugh 

FOLTZ, Raymond A. 
Lena Ba i ley Myers 

FOLTZ, Richard S. 
Lynn Wo I fe 
Andrew 

FOLTZ, Willis H. 
Margaret Hill 
Carrie 
Julia 

FRANCIS, John H. 
Mi Id red Foltz 
Raygi na 
Derek 
Mari anne 

GIESLER, John H. 
Barbara Gordon 
Deborah 
Chris 
Rebecca 
Cynthia 

GOINGS, Ralph J. 
Nancy Knouse 
Bart 
Li sa 



GRIFFITH, Mrs. Richard B. 
(Mervin Mi I ler) 

HANES, Travis F. 
Evva Foltz 
Ramona 
Michae I 
Jonathan 
Carol ine 

HANES, W. James 
Mabel Foltz 

HARTMAN, Mrs. Fred E. 
(Margaret Mendenhal I) 

HARTMAN, Miss Nettie 

HARTMAN, Ray A. 

Bord ie Be I I Pardue 

HARTMAN, Ronnie M. 

HARTMAN, Thomas A. 

HEDGECOCK, J. Frank, Jr. 
Betty Myers 
Ma re i a 
Phi I I ip 

HEDGECOCK, Ronald B. 
Sy I vi a Ki rby 
Apri I 

HEGE, Miss Elva H. 

HEGE, G. Preston 
The I ma Mahaffey 

HEGE, Mrs. Manie 
(Letha CI inard) 

HERMAN, Mrs. Judy Foltz 

HILL, Mrs. Albert R. 
(Anne Payne) 
Bruce 

HOLDER, Oscar E. 
Doris Foltz 

HOPKINS, Mrs. James T. 
(Jane Dru Weisner) 
Davi d 



Page 98 



HURD, M. Herbert, Jr. 
Drue Reynolds 
Tamara 

HUTCHENS, Mrs. Robert R. 
Carol Long 
Robert, Jr. 
Lisa 
Kenneth 

HYATT, James H. 
Helen Weisner 



KETNER, Kenneth G. 
Gai I Cockerham 
Charles 
Suzanne 

KIMEL, C. A., Jr. 
Patty Hamner 
Charles 
Ray 

KIMEL, Dwain 
Janice Weaver 



JACKSON, George F. 
Ruth Cook 
David 
Deborah 
Steve 
Gary 
Jeff 

JESTER, Thad W. 
Sadie Clark 

JOHNSON, Donald C. 
Janet Sink 
Lisa 

JOHNSON, Miss Nannie Sue 

JONES, Mrs. Elser F. 
(Patsy Mil ler) 

JONES, Troy 0. 

Del ia James Fol tz 



KIMEL, Fred C. 
Blanche Hoffman 

KIMEL, Larry N. 
Linda Scott 
Steven Scott 

KIMEL, Mrs. Thomas 
(Mattie Mi ze) 

KIMEL, Ralph A. 
Mary DeLapp 
Tanya 

KIMEL, Rex 
A I ise 
Ryan 

KIMEL, Russel I S. 
Mi I dred Nuckal I s 
Mark 
John 



JONES, Vance E. 
Li I I ian Smith 

JONES, Jerry V. 

JOYCE, Robert F. 
Judy Fishel 

KEARSE, Mrs. James Edward 
(Hazel Jones Vernon) 
Charles Vernon 

KELLY, Daniel J., Jr. 
Iris Ellis 
Jeff 

KESSLER, Mrs. John A. 
(Bea Find I ing) 
Jenn ifer 



KNOUSE, Bobby J. 
Carol Scott 
Kim 
Kathy 

KNOUSE, Mrs. Charlie 
(Del la Crotts) 

K00NTZ, Mrs. Donald D. 
(Audrey Foltz) 

LAMBETH, Minehardt R. 
Melba Sink 
Michael 

LAMBETH, M. Ray, Jr. 
Patricia Re id 
Todd 



Page 99 



LANDRETH, Joel M. 
Bonnie Petrel I 



MENDENHALL, Richard J 
Luna Sink 



LAWSON, Carl D. 
Peggy Atkinson 
Mark 
Leah 
Timothy 

LEE, Mrs. Vernon J. 
(Laura Lee) 
Angela 

LINDLEY, Mrs. Jack S. 
(Adelaide Tesh) 
Gary 

LINDSEY, Mrs. John 
(Blanche Stoner) 

LINEBACK, Emory L. 
Dorothy Fishel 

LITTLE, W. Paul , Jr. 
Ruth Snyder 

LITTLE JOHN, Mrs. Duwayne 
(Barbara Clark) 

LIVENGOOD, Clarence J., Jr. 
Carmel Fishel 

LOCKMAN, Mrs. C. David, Jr. 
(Nancy lynn Will iams) 
Tamara 

MADDOX, Stedham L. 
Sara Seagraves 
Stedham, Jr. 
Cynthia 

MARANVILLE, Joseph W. 
Betty Hartley 
Teja 

MARANVILLE, Le Vaughn 
Judy Keg ley 
Vonda Mia 

MENDENHALL, Francis C. 
Ears ley Hege 
Susan 
Charles 



MENDENHALL, Wi I burn F. 

MILLER, Arnold D. 
Maggie Knott 

MILLER, Jasper A. 
Annie Michel I 
Lynne 

MILLER, M. Kent 
Margaret Lomax 
Ma rt i n 
Ann 

MILLER, Robert F. 
Reva Jones 
Frank 
Ann 
Sandra 

MILLER, Russel I F. 
Ruby Haigewood 

MILLER, Wi I I iam M. 

MIZE, C. J. 
Opal Foltz 
Carole Anne 
Debra 
Mel issa 

MOORE, Jimmy W. 
Wi Ima Manning 
Cathy 
Judith 

MOXLEY, Ray A. 
Violet Bertram 

MULL IS, Roger H. 
Eddis Farmer 

MURPHY, Gary G. 
Stephanie 

MURPHY, H. G., Jr. 
Vi rginia Koontz 

MYERS, Mrs. S. CI i f ton 
(Lessie Green) 



MENDENHALL, Mrs. K. P. 
(Esther Fishel) 



McCANN, Mrs. C. E. 
(Ruth May Payne) 



Page 100 



NICHOLS, Mrs. Donald M. 

(Nancy Mi I ler) 

Gregory Casey 

Bonnie Casey 

Sara Nichols 

NIFONG, Henry C, Jr. 
Maude Sink 

NIFONG, Wayne E. 
Gay I Surridge 
Doug las 
Jenni fer 
Rebecca 
Stephen 

NORMAN, Mrs. Stephen 
(Sharon Ervin) 
Andrea 



PENRY, Mrs. Roswe I I 
(Lei ia Foltz) 

PERRYMAN, Mrs. Ronnie 
(Myra Tulbert) 

QUICK, Charles P. 
Joan Vernon 
Janel 

RAGAN, Mrs. Timothy J. 
(Cynthia Tesh) 

REDDEN, Charles R. 
Martha Craver 
Michael 

REECE, Mrs. Martin D. 
(Brenda Sue Sides) 



PADGETT, CI if ford C. 
Mary Thornton 

PARNELL, Mrs. Coy 
(Eunice Shore) 

PAYNE, Charles C, Jr. 
Reba Hinkle 

PAYNE, Mrs. Charles C, Sr. 
(Mary Frances Holmes) 

PAYNE, H. By n urn 
Hi Ida Kimel 

PAYNE, John R. 
Ramona Welch 
Stacy 

PAYNE, Larry G. 
Desdemona Ki rby 
Annette 

PAYNE, Paul R. 
Grace Chapel 

PAYNE, Ralph E. 
Lemma Cartner 
Dona I d 

PAYNE, Terry W. 
Tif fani 

PENRY, Mrs. Howard 
(Ella Mae Kimel ) 



REICH, Mrs. Carl W., Jr. 
(Betty Hine) 
Richard 
Sandra 
Carolyn 

REICH, Edward M. 
Barbara Hemrick 
Michael 

REICH, Ralph 
Mary Linvi I le 

REICH, Samuel L. 
Joy Sexton 
Phi I I ip 
Catherine 
Anna 

REID, Frank 
Mearlene Ceci I 

REID, Mrs. Larry G. 
(Mitzi Greer) 
Eric Scott 

RIERSON, Charl ie T. 
Nancy Spainhour 
Lisa 
Pamel a 

RIERSON, Mrs. J. M. 
(Martha Searcy) 

RING, Mrs. Bobby 
(Carol Beckel) 



Page 101 



RITCH, Mrs. Wood row D. 
(Fannie Craver) 
Rebecca Elaine 

ROESEL, Wi I I iam F. 
Frances Payne 

ROGERS, Mrs. Robert R. 
(Barbara Becke I ) 
Roxanne 

RUSSELL, Maryl ina S. 

SCOTT, Kenneth G. 
Me r I e Re i d 
Keith 
Angel a 
Kimberly 

SHELL, Mrs. James, Jr. 
Peggy Sides 
Stephen 
Ronald 

SHELTON, Mrs. John H. 
(Bertha Fishel ) 

SHEPPARD, Mrs. James Andrew 
(Jackie Sue Lindley) 
James Andrew, Jr. 

SHIELDS, Mrs. H. H. 
(Ethel Foltz) 

SHORE, Jerry W. 
Loretta Sides 
Michael Wayne 

SHORE, Mrs. Wi I I iam J. 
(Fannie Cornish) 

SHORE, Wi I I iam N. 
Pearl Sink 
Martha 

SIDES, Mrs. Pol ly S. 
(Pol ly Snyder) 
Brenda Elaine 
Freddie 
Kathy 

SIDES, Bruner L. 
Linda Fletcher 
Gary 
Randal I 



SIDES, Daniel C. (Boone) 
Mary Reich 
Ricky 
Robin 

SIDES, Homer T. 
Bonnie Payne 
Debra 

SIDES, Paul D. 
Perry Myers 

SIDES, Randy L. 
Shannon Rebecca 

SINK, Albert T. 
Kristel Lee 

SINK, Clay Van 

SINK, Clyde E., Jr. 
Clara Tesh 

SINK, Mrs. Clyde E., Sr. 
(Mae Conrad) 

SINK, C. Edward, I I I 
Gina Suzette 

SINK, Mrs. John 
(El la Fishel) 

SINK, Rex A. 
Betty Shumake 
Vicky 
Cheryl 
Janet 
Mel inda 

SINK, Thomas R. 
Judith Cockerham 
Davi d 

SIZEMORE, J. Otis, Jr. 
Beverly Bel I 
Me I an ie 
Shannon 
Mel i ssa 
James 

SNYDER, AM ie T. 

SNYDER, Emory R. 
Sarah Spaugh 

SNYDER, Larry R. 



Page 102 



SNYDER, Hoy P. 
Annie Swain 



TESH, Mrs. Howard F. 
(Ethel Faw) 



SNYDER, Mrs. P. N. 
(Lema Shoaf) 

SPARKS, C. Max 
Evelyn Smitherman 
Wi I I iam 
Timothy 
Steven 

SPAUGH, Herbert B. 

SPRADLIN, Mrs. John E. 
(Mary Sink) 
Patty 

STAKER, Ronald W. 
Cornel ia Murphy 

STUTTS, Dennis L. 
Judith Hauser 
Cynthia 

SURRIDGE, Ralph G. 
Myrtle Row I edge 
David 

SUTPHIN, James S. 
Josephine Hunt 
Lorraine 
Norman 

SUTPHIN, Roy C. 
Sadie Lawson 

SUTPHIN, Tommy G. 
Gray 
Leigh 

SWAIM, Miss Flora 

SWAIM, Mrs. Jesse E. 
(Maria Hartman) 

SWAIM, Miss Mary 

TAYLOR, Mrs. Johnny W., Jr. 
(Pau lette Bargoi I ) 

TESH, Miss Esther 

TESH, Fred A. 
Margaret Payne 
Fred, Jr. 



TESH, Harvey A. 
Barbara Plaster 
Jane 

TESH, Larry E. 
Nancy Mu I I i s 
Joann 

TESH, Luther E. 
Ruby Ni fong 
Jerry 

TESH, Mrs. Wi I I iam B., Sr, 
(Pearl Foltz) 

THOMPSON, Mrs. Bennie 
(Rachel Mendenhal I ) 

TOLLEY, Jerry W. 
Gai I Foltz 
Eric 

TULBERT, Chester C. 
Nancy Fishel 
Keith 
Kitty 
Jenny 

TULBERT, James C. 

TULBERT, Gary W. 

TUTTEROW, Kim M. 
Joan Bledsoe 
Kel ly 

WALSER, Miss Al ice J. 

WARNER, Mrs. Robah 
(Monti e Kimel ) 

WATKINS, David L. 

WATKINS, 01 in J. 
Ermalee Crouch 

WATKINS, W. Roy 
Blanche Sink 

WEAVER, Robert L. 
Laura Reich 
Li nda 



Page 103 



WEAVER, Ronald L. 

WEISNER, James F. 

Lottie (Bennie) Kimei 
Karen 

WEISNER, Lou A. 
Judy Taylor 
Donna 

WEISNER, Mrs. M. 0. 
(Dion CI i nard) 

WEISNER, Phi II ip K. 
Linda Snyder 

WEISNER, Thor E. 
Jean Powers 

WELCH, Creed C. 
Ruth Mize 

WELCH, Ray F. 

Michael Andrew 
Jeffrey Lee 



WEST, Edward F., Ill 

WEST, Roger D. 
Martha Beeson 

WOOD, Roger L. 

W00SLEY, Carl H. 

W00SLEY, Clyde L. 
Flore Matthews 

YOUNTS, Jasper A., Jr. 
Mozel le Fol tz 

YOUNTS, C. Gray 

ZIMMERMAN, Guy B. 



The Lofid blub you, and keep you; 

The. Loud make. Haj> ^acz &hiviz upon you, 
and be QK.acA.oui, unto you; 

The. Lofid ti^t up H-u Counte.na.nae upon you, 
and give you peace; 

In the Name o& JeAui, , Amen. 



Page 104